Death of the Sun

2006 ,    »  -   3 Comments
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Ratings: 7.21/10 from 28 users.
Storyline
Death of the Sun

The Sun sustains all life on our planet. As we frolic and bask under the warmth of its glow, little do we realize how it may one day have the power to destroy us as well. Death of the Sun, produced by the renowned Naked Science series, outlines the birth and potential demise of the most formidable star in our solar system.

The aging process is rarely kind to any living thing. But in the case of the Sun, the diminishing returns of old age could mean disaster for our entire planet. Our technologies would be rendered useless, plant life would wither without nourishment, and mankind could be rocked by a power akin to a global nuclear explosion.

"All stars have a limited lifetime," warns astrologer Donald Brownlee early in the film. In order to determine the Sun's life expectancy, scientists must first discover how old it is. Until recently, collecting the samples necessary to make this determination has proven impossible amidst such a volatile and scorching celestial environment. As detailed in the film, scientists eventually uncovered an ingenious method for arriving at this calculation, and it involved the capturing of atoms from the Sun's energy force, a free-falling parachute, and the daredevil heroics of a Hollywood stunt pilot.

The research doesn't stop there. The filmmakers visit various institutes across the United States, and interview key players who operate on the forefront of this field of study. One researcher reveals how energy emanates from the Sun's core, and manages to overcome enormous obstacles to reach us here on Earth. An astrophysicist calls upon the science of sound to pinpoint the Sun's age with even greater precision. Space weather forecasters examine the Sun's most violent episodes throughout recent history, and keep constant watch for any further activities that could disrupt our way of life.

The Sun might be 93 million miles away from us, but its relevance to our daily existence couldn't be more immediate. Death of the Sun may seem like a fantastical what-if scenario from a big budget disaster film. But for many scientists, it's not a question of if, but when.

3 Comments / User Reviews

  1. mysterioso

    The doc description reads... "...potential demise of the most formidable star in our solar system." Uh, I think its the only star in our solar system.

  2. Martin Hedington

    Perhaps the OP confused the term with Galaxy. Ours containing over 200 Billion of them.

  3. LeeJai Cook

    December 21, 2016. LeeJai Cook, Roaring Springs, Texas USA.
    Thank you very much for posting these videos!

    Relax! Our sun is good for another 25 billion years!
    From THE URANTIA BOOK:
    41:9.5 Your own sun has long since attained relative equilibrium between its
    expansion and contraction cycles, those disturbances which produce the gigantic
    pulsations of many of the younger stars. Your sun is now passing out of its six
    billionth year. At the present time it is functioning through the period of
    greatest economy. It will shine on as of present efficiency for more than
    twenty-five billion years. It will probably experience a partially efficient
    period of decline as long as the combined periods of its youth and stabilized
    function.
    15:6.4 The trillions upon trillions of years that an ordinary sun will continue
    to give out heat and light well illustrates the vast store of energy which each
    unit of matter contains. The actual energy stored in these invisible particles
    of physical matter is well-nigh unimaginable. And this energy becomes almost
    wholly available as light when subjected to the tremendous heat pressure and the
    associated energy activities which prevail in the interior of the blazing suns.

    SUN DENSITY
    41:4.1 The mass of your sun is slightly greater than the estimate of your
    physicists, who have reckoned it as about two octillion (2 x 1027) tons. [Note: Be
    sure that the “27” is shown as Superscript so that it reads “10 to the 27th power.”]
    It now exists about halfway between the most dense and the most diffuse stars,
    having about one and one-half times the density of water. But your sun is neither a
    liquid nor a solid—it is gaseous—and this is true notwithstanding the difficulty
    of explaining how gaseous matter can attain this and even much greater
    densities.
    41:7.2 The surface temperature of your sun is almost 6,000 degrees, but it
    rapidly increases as the interior is penetrated until it attains the
    unbelievable height of about 35,000,000 degrees in the central regions. (All of
    these temperatures refer to your Fahrenheit scale.)

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