Energy War

Energy WarForget the axis of evil, its the axis of oil. The Cold War and the War on Terror were about ideology and globalization. The 21st century will be dominated by the struggle for energy: It will be every man for himself and it's going to get dirty.

In the two-part documentary Energy War, VPRO's Backlight investigates the major developments with regards to energy sources. Featuring NY Times columnist Thomas Friedman.

The film describes the geopolitical consequences of the dependency on fossil fuels. In the struggle for the last sources of fossil fuels, countries all over the world are forced to take new political and moral decisions and have to enter into awkward alliances: rogue regimes must be tolerated and befriended.

With a special focus on the gas conflict between Georgia and Russia and the position of Saudi Arabia. Featuring a.o. Thomas Friedman, author of international bestseller The World is Flat. Friedman sheds his light on the inverse connection between rising oil prices and the establishment of free democracies.

The film then moves on to take a look at the international markets for alternative energy. If oil and gas are scarce and expensive in the future, where will countries turn to keep their economy going and their population warm and happy?

Could solar energy or bio fuels become the main energy sources of the post-fossil fuel era? Will governments, multinationals or small producers be the motor of the green race?

Watch the full documentary now

334
8.38
12345678910
Ratings: 8.38/10 from 8 users.
  • Ramus

    In between the description and the google ad where there is normally a video there is just a blank space :[.....

  • Brian

    Brilliant, thanks!

  • DeathSSghosT

    well im glad i live in america cuz we will just take the oil if we want it. i think iraq proves that.

  • sookie stackhouse

    we will soon have fusion and nano technology to replace our dependence on the energy and material properties of crude oil. we will be able to synthesise liquid wires magnetically bound in coils of anti-matter plasma to make quantam and neural computing a reality. technology will save us when humanity and masterbation fails.

  • Luka

    Gimme a break Saudi Arabia the worlds only true dictatorship whose name Saudi comes from the ruling family name, being displayed as an democratic ally to the US buahahahahha, never used oil as a weapon exept in Arab Israeli war and to bring down SSSR. This documentary is biased, and besides its not like during WW2 when americans had more than 50% world oil production and magicaly managed to fund the British, German, and Soviet side in the war while ending up as the owerall victor in the war. THE PRICE OF OIL IS CONTROLLED BY THE USA BY THE MEANS OF SAUDI DICTATORSHIP as all the oil exept the oil from the "evil" Russia, Iran and Venezuella is charged in US dollars wich as far as I know are beeing printed in only one cuntry on this planet!

  • Julio Riquelme

    It's a dumb and falacious documentary...no one is going to invent anything to replace oil before it runs out in a few years...technology is not going to save us...we will pay for our stupid mistakes...and we will pay dearly...so dream on you alternative fuel nuts...it's going to get tough...so prepare yourselves for the worst...IT'S COMING PRETTY SOON...BYE

  • Ryan

    Julio,

    Um...so you're saying that we shouldn't even try? It's not even worth it? We might as well just give up? With logic like that, it's like your praying for this to happen.

  • JustinLee

    What Julio said.

  • solar_blaze

    renewable energy technology is already out there.....its justthat the corporations are the ones holding us back....

  • Bobby D

    I hope you're right, sookie, but I just want to point out that masturbation never fails. It's proven. By science.

  • Waldo

    I am sick of watching these documentaries and hearing about alternative this and that. I have been hearing this since I was born, right before the 73 oil crisis. Still we are just as, if not more, addicted to oil as ever. I agree with the others that said nothing will change until the last drop of crude is sold. At that point and in the short time leading up to it, things will be restructured and the global environment will definetly change- whether for the better or worse I realy don't know and i suppose that depends on where you live.

  • two hamburgers and a hotdog

    we need to kill all the donkeys.

  • emanuel

    its fairly obvious

    Automotive industry is going to pinch every penny possible out of oil and when it dries up they will have the infrastructure in place to move on and capitalize the next thing

    There is no shortage of fuel/resources on this planet so we are not in any danger.

  • Steve Baker

    I just ordered solar cells

  • http://www.documentairenet.nl Eeuwe

    Great documentary of a great Dutch program called Tegenlicht(Backlight). This documentary contains a lot of speculating, but then again when i watched this documentary it made me think a lot about how long it's going to take befor ww3 begins. This time energy will be the goal.

    Also watch other Backlight documentary's, there are a lot of them that have been put online with english subtitles etc.

  • http://www.coalminingappalachia.com CoalMiningAppalachia

    I watched this last night. I thought it was excellent.

  • Alan

    Friedman's arrogance is staggering. I'm convinced he truly believes America spreads freedom & democracy. A highly educated New York times writer, and a deluded propagandist all rolled into one. Anyone know who funded this documentary? They are using the (very real) energy crisis to push political agendas.

  • http://djamelweb djamel

    idid'nt see any videos or documentaries films i demand these now and directly to my box prefering wild films if you are agreed

  • riley

    waaaay too much of a single analyst (friedman)

    most of the points are reasonable, though fairly obvious:

    petro-states are regressive
    the west, particularly the u.s., should shift to conservation, while a failure to do so will invite further negative developments

    my firm expectation is that we (chavez' gringos) will continue to consume/waste until we have to stop, which will only occur when the price goes even higher and stays there, creating a political & market demand for change - long after a more reasonable, bounded society would have undertaken the adjustment so obviously called-for long since.

  • alex

    Mad Maxi ha

  • Ron

    @Alan
    You have very selective listening skills. Take it from someone who has lived and worked in Qatar and the United Arab Emirates and was raised in North America.

    When he says people in the US drive Trucks while importing 80% of their oil and paying $800 Billion a year to people who have the ability to financially support the enemies of the US...he is he spouting propoganda?

    I laugh at the Saudi's and big financial city. Qatar is building one. Dubia has one and wants to expand it. Ok so they go from Oil to banks and so called tourism. Tourism. that is even more of a joke. Go to Saudi for a holiday? The morality police will come in while you are having dinner and give your wife a hard time for not having her hair covered or her ankles covered. Oh and bring your wife cause if it is your girlfriend take care because if you get caught with her in public they will only stone her or whip her etc. Tourism? what a joke.

    Qatar gets the world cup in 2022? So how are people going to enjoy going from venue to venue when it is 44 Degrees Celcius with 85% humidity? And in the evening and night it will cool down to 38 Degrees with 90% humidity.

    Friedman is right on the ball. These countries with Oil now have it easy. Their children are educated well but many are given educations with out getting an education if you know what I mean. How many teachers keep their jobs in Gulf countires if they fail a child for not doing any work? I know...NONE. They are cultures without motivation to innovate or do better. They are cultures that believe their own B$ and think they have their future taken care of. I have not met a single Qatary or Emiratie who works hard or has a mind for work cares about anyone but themselves. They know how to play with mobile phones and talk to their friends all day though while some foreigner does their job for them. The people with Oil with definitely not supply us out of this position we find ourselves in globally.

    Without Oil they go back to what they were before Oil. No one will hold the supply of solar cells or new nano technology that takes over from solar. Solar is the future and we just have to wait for the Thomas Edison's and Henry Fords or Wilbur and Oriville Wrights to lead us there.

    Maybe Saudi starts those guys off but it will not be like Oil. They will not hold the supply of that technology and it will not be enough to support their economies. Venezuela becomes a technology hub? That is beyond laughable. They go back to the sticks.

    And Al-Zahami and how the west told them to go with solar and they did not want to do it. TOTALLY TYPICAL. Like they would listen to people in 1980 about what to do with their money. The interviewer has no credibility to let them talk like that. You go from shutting off the supply in 1973 to listening to the west tell you to build a solar facility that you knew would not work and be too expensive. That pretty much sums up totally the arab attitude about things. When things go well they are all over it taking credit. When things go wrong they point fingers everywhere. From the kid in grade 1 to the ex minister of oil. That is the culture.

    Friedman is 100% on this one and it isn't some leftist propoganda.

  • Ron

    @Euwe
    You discredit Friedman as if he hasn't done anything but read a few articles on the subject. I think he is an expert on the subject and has travelled around the world and done a fair bit of research. All his hypothesis may not come to be but it is very far from pure speculation and assumption.

    He understands the cultures and the politics just as I understand the cultures of the west and the cultures of the gulf. They will most definitely not lead us out.

  • Ron

    @emaneul
    No it will be the american conusmer demanding large SUV's from car manufacturers that will do it.

    I am in Italy right now and it is Euro 1.30 for a liter of gas. That is over $6 US a gallon. I don't see any full on Dodge Ram Pick Ups here or Escalades etc. And it is not because people don't have to drive as far as they do in the US it is because fuel costs so much. It is the people and culture of the US that is doing it to themselves.

  • Ron

    @Waldo
    It is not an easy thing to overcome. Oil became a life changer for earth in the last 200 years. Our lifestyles advanced so exponentially over that time due to energy and the use of it to make our lives and living easier.

    There is no boogeyman or genie being kept in a bottle. This is a biggie to overcome to satisfy the need that we have created with oil.

    Hopefully some bright mind comes up with solar cells that get 30-50% of the suns effeciency converted to electricity and then we are one step closer. Then all we need is a method fo storage etc. It is a big one but the sun spits out enough energy to make it so. We just need that one person or group of people to put it all together. And it will happen.

  • Ron

    Ok enough of my thoughts sorry for going on. I have a child and I know he will curse us one day as many will. We are stupid. And I hope we can change that.

  • Ron

    Wow V. I did not know that someone could use the word in a video but I could not post it. Whats up with that.

    Great Doc by the way. I have not seen anything with this much truth in it...how I see it anyway...for a long time.

    Maybe Carl Sagan is motivating the person to take us all out of this mess via your site.

  • Ron

    sorry one last one for 2 burgers and a hot dog

    You make a funny point but I spent time in Gode Ethiopia recently. It looks to me like what things will look like if we run out of oil with no alternative.

    Donkeys doing the transport. Let them live we may need them more than you know. Maybe a 100 years from now but if we don't change something we will only have the animals to make ti all work.

    Ok CHOW!

  • Waldo

    @ Ron

    I think we have the energy sources covered all ready, maybe a little research required to make the tech more efficient but it has been created. Solar, geo thermal, hydro, hydrogen fuel cells, nuclear, wind, etc. will take care of the energy needs. It is all the petroleum derivitives that I worry about, everything from tooth paste to fertilizer, not to mention lubrication needs. Also the fact that since WW2 almost all global relations are based on who has oil and who buys it from them, a whole new global paradigm is going to emerge, and it could get ugly. I don't buy this, its difficult excuse though. I realize we can't just snap our fingers and make it happen, but we have seen this coming since the early seventies if not sooner, that's plenty of time to be well ahead of where we are. Also I don't want to be arguementative but, if you don't believe that big oil has discouracged any real progress toward implementing the already existing tech, you are blind. They don't discourage the research near as much as they do the implementation.

  • Wayne

    It's all a matter of economics. when the cost of oil exceeded the cost of newer energy sources, the corporate energy cartels will switch over.
    To assist in increasing the amount we pay for energy, we are asked to reduce our energy use which reduces the income of the utilities which causes increases in the units of energy.
    Since the reduction of energy use is slow, the final utility bill increses and profits are made on the back side which is used to prepare the alternative energy implementation.

  • Imightberiding

    Is no one aware of what Brazil has done in recent years? They are completely energy self sufficient & import no foreign oil. By using an old simple technology with just a few tweaks they now have a renewable resource based industry in full swing that is 100% efficient in that all of the product is used during production. We have been distilling alcohol forever & have the technology in place. This is no different than the non existent hemp industry. Multi-National corps controlling competition. Esp the giant oil companies.

    I'm talking about ethanol produced from sugar cane. Sure there are still some kinks to be worked out. Some include farmland & labour/harvesting issues but it is a much cleaner & renewable resource. Even the chaff left over from the production of the ethanol is burned instead of coal to produce electricity. It's not perfect yet but well on it's way. In Brazil flex fuel cars & trucks are the norm. They run on both petrol & ethanol & at the pumps the cost of ethanol is less than half that of petrol.

    In North America the ethanol is produced using corn. Much more expensive & far less efficient. What about the use of sugar beets in the northern climes. Are there not several other nations agriculturally suited to grow sugar cane.

    It frustrates the heck out of me that we do not have thriving & viable hemp & ethanol industries in North America. I realize this does not solve every thing. Waldo mentioned the derivatives from oil. Perhaps we could ear mark all the remaining reserves just for that purpose until our technology can surpass the old & we find new ways to produce these things or new replacement products. I sure the two products I mentioned could go a long way towards solving many of our troubles.

    All I know is that I could still fill up my motorcycle & be a very happy boy!

  • Imightberiding

    Wanted to say a bit more about ethanol production from sugar beets. My only fear is that one of you will steal my idea or I will be assassinated by an oil company. :-)

    Just kidding, but really people, we already have the answers we need to take us to the next place, where ever that may be?

  • Ron

    @Waldo
    If the auto companies were sitting on any real alternative whey would they be producing the Volt or Hybrids. You have nothing to stand on other than to be argumentative with your ignorance. You think there is a boogeyman with no proof other than to say there must be one.

    @Imightberiding
    How much energy does Brazil consume per person and how much does the US consume per person? There is not enough arable land in the US to do what you think should just be so easy for people to see. And I think you also are ignorant that somehow the solution is supressed by a boogeyman. If we had that answer I think it would be economically important that people suppressing it would be totally assinine to not want to make trillions of dollars from it.

  • Ron

    @Waldo
    And to add Friedman reminded us that new technologies are never created by the creators of the old. So you are suggesting that for the first time in our technological history this will happen? Or that the auto industry has created this but is suppressing it?

    Has Microsoft really done anything to bring new technology to computing? My answer is no. Otherwise Apple would not be doing so well. Otherwise I would not own an apple rather than a PC. And that is because the Microsoft world is about buying someone elses technology rather than try and innovate internally. Friedman is very correct and knows all the angles of this story.

  • TDRPETE

    @deathssghost im also glad i dont live in america as we dont have to blow up our own buildings eg the twin towers and kill our own citizens in order to wage a war against another country for your insatiable appetite for oil.

  • efanton

    ethanol, sugar bet etc fixes the fuel issue if we act now.

    What about Pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers? all these are derived from oil.

    grain production will drop even if we use ethanol which will make it more expensive.

    A pig will eat 1/2 ton of grain in its lifetime before its slaughtered for meat. Now your meat has become dramtically more expensive.

    Salads and veggies where do they come from. The vast majoirty are imported, requiring huge amount of energy. I we were to grow them ourselves this would require huge amounts of land, but wait we have already used that up producing ethanol. Even if the land was available most of the green houses would have to be heated using even more energy.

    But just imagine we can somehow produce the same amount of food, it has to be packaged? Plastics anyone? plastics cannot be produced from ethanol. the Food wastage will be horrendous unless we go back 100 years and totally rely on food products that produced in our own locality. Goof luck to New York and other cities because they simply will not be able to do it.

    What we have now is a completely unsustainable way of life that biofuels simply cannot maintain. a sinlge field of oilseed rape (canola in US) will produce less than a second worth of our current energy use and that takes a year to produce.

    The reality of the situation is simple. An end to city life or mass depopulation

    So forget about you arguments over alternative fuel and power sources

    THE REAL ARGUMENT IS ABOUT FOOD AND AN END TO OUR CURRENT WAY OF LIFE.

  • Ron

    @efanton
    ever hear of canning?

  • Waldo

    @ Ron

    What a rude little person you are, and no I am not suggesting anything of the such. I never implied it either, are you on meds or something. I said that big oil companies, not automobile manufacturers, try and block the implementation of new alternative sources. And i even named the alternative sources i was referring to: Solar, geo thermal, hydro, hydrogen fuel cells, nuclear, wind, etc. As you can see these fall right in line with what the car manufacturers are playing with. So- no, I wasn't suggesting any boogey man with technology that is incredible. In fact I didn't care to argue with you or anyone else. I simply stated my opinion, (which is that big oil will never let us change until they have sold the last drop of crude that can be extracted) and let it go, maybe you should do the same. You seem to have a severe need to be right about this, calm down man.

  • efanton

    @Ron

    Yes, I vaguely remember something called cans in my cupboard :P
    If you want to live on canned food for the rest of your life be my guest. I personally would like some fresh meat and veg from time to time.

    It seems you are here just to be pedantic or claim the position of thread troll.

  • Milton Babb

    Not one mention of Nicola Tesla!

  • Milton Babb

    the Arabs are just greedy enough to sell their oil to the Republicans.

  • http://www.scitechexplained.com alex

    Peak Oil is the moment when humanity has pretty much produced and consumed half of its oil. This oil that we’ve burned happened to be the most clean, most cheap, most easy to find, and most easy to extract on the planet. Peak Oil doesn’t mean we’re running out of oil, it just means we’ve consumed the better half of it and we’re going to have to adapt to a life not so dependent on abundant and pristine oil. We have to look for it off-shore at hard to reach depths, in countries with not so friendly or totalitarian regimes, and even so the amount of oil we will extract will not meet our infinite growth economic paradigm.

    So what if cheap and pristine oil runs out? There are alternatives, right? Russia and Iran are considered the top holders of natural gas resources in the world with more than 70 trillion cubic meters of reserves. We have Shale Gas, Shale Oil, Tar Sands, Biomass, Coal-to-Liquids, Solar Energy, Wind Turbines, Hydropower, Nuclear Power. But can these keep the pace with our ever increasing demands?

    First we need to understand that the way society, industry, and pretty much all of humanity works right now is by means of burning fossil fuels. Our societal architecture stays on its feet only because of oil, gas, and coal. If these energy sources would vanish so would our society’s infrastructure. But couldn’t we just switch to other energy sources as we please? The Hirsch Report, or Peaking of World Oil Production: Impacts, Mitigation, and Risk Management, was a investigation specially created for the US Department of Energy and concluded that decisive actions of changing infrastructure need to be made decades before the Peak Oil moment in order to adequately overcome the transition period. The Hirsch Report states : “Any transition of liquid fueled, end-use equipment following oil peaking will be time consuming. The depreciated value of existing U.S. transportation capital stock is nearly $2 trillion and would normally require 25 – 30 years to replace. At that rate, significantly more energy efficient equipment will only be slowly phased into the marketplace as new capital stock gradually replaces existing stock. Oil peaking will likely accelerate replacement rates, but the transition will still require decades and cost trillions of dollars.”

    In order to better understand the problems we are facing we need to get the grips with the concept of ERoEI (Energy Returned on Energy Invested) or EROI (Energy Return On Investment). This index represents the ratio between the energy obtained from the process of energy production that is ready to be made available for human consumption and the energy invested in order to produce it. So for example if one company exploits a oil field that has an ERoEI of 15:1 this means that it needs to burn 1 unit of energy in order to produce 15 units; so the net energy of an ERoEI index of 15:1 is 14. It makes pretty much sense that an ERoEI of 1:1 or less would be a total waste of time because any investment in a process that produces less energy than you put in would generally not make any sense.

    The ERoEI index of Oil and Natural Gas back in the 1930s easily exceeded the value of 100:1, while in the 1970s the value leveled at about 30:1. This was of course due to the fact that the fields were big, easy to find, not at a great depth, and with easily recoverable resources. Once we’ve peaked oil discoveries back in the 1960s the value of the ERoEI started to decline at such a rate that today’s oil fields are producing energy at an estimated ERoEI index of 5-15:1.

    So, when Peak Oil happens we will have consumed the oil with the largest ERoEI index. What remains is the poorer quality oil with the ERoEI below the value of 10:1 because more energy is needed in order to find, extract, and refine it.

    With these numbers in mind, we need to maintain a careful attitude when we compare ERoEIs of conventional oil and gas with the ERoEIs of alternative energy producing systems. For example, even if hydropower has an estimated ERoEI of over 100:1 this won’t make much difference in the long run because its current contribution to the global energy output is only 2.2%; massive investments need to be made, and a vast array environmental and geological constraints need to be overcome, if we want to increase the number of hydropower facilities; this remains valid for nuclear energy also. Other energy sources like wind turbines, solar panels, fuels derived from biomass have very low ERoEI levels compared to today’s fossil fuels’ potency and energy density.

    So, our future energy sources can’t produce the net energy needed to sustain the paradigmatic infinite growth society which has now started to receive nudges from mother nature. Is this empirical, or am i just being inattentive to the optimists’ way too buoyant attitude? Look at the graph! 80% of global energy is fossil fuels! Once fossil fuels become hard to exploit because of their lower ERoEI how are we going to feed the infinite growth society which has its functional architecture specifically designed to be fueled only by easy to get, cheap, clean, abundant, and high ERoEI energy? The alternatives, experts say, can’t provide this energy! So, maybe a major shift in the architecture of society is needed.

    The very-optimists need to understand one important fact: Fossil fuel technology is only a energy-transfer tool, not an energy creation tool. It transfers energy, be it gas, oil, coal, from its natural storage place, deep underground, to industrial facilities that further convert it into a form that can be easily consumed by humans. 80% of the planet’s energy usage is comprised of fuels derived from oil, coal, and gas. These fossil fuels were never created by humans, instead they were created for us tens of millions of years ago in the long process of chemical baking of the organic matter that laid dead on the toxic layers of seas and oceans because of the extreme global warming that bedeviled those long gone times. So, it is a extreme error of logic to assume that technology is akin to Aladdin’s magic lamp, disconnected from all finite natural resources and capable of sprouting matter and energy just if we rub it the right way.

    Human ingenuity is often brought into the discussion by Peak Oil very-optimists. They arrogantly assume there is now way that cheap oil shortage can ever put our infinite growth society to a halt. There will be a flash of brilliance, a struck of genius, a bright idea that will surely counterweight our predicament. Notwithstanding, however God-given technological ingenuity might seem, it couldn’t yet offer us cheap and efficient treatments for Myopia, Diabetes, AIDS, Hepatitis, and Cancer. It hasn’t yet invented a working Quantum Computer, Quantum Teleportation, and hyperluminic-speed traveling spaceships. Indeed, the laws of physics put hard constraints on our speed of technological advancement and even on future possibilities; we may never travel faster than light, we may never build a macroscopic teleporting device, and we may never build a quantum computer, even though today we gladly enjoy technological marvels akin to magic. And by the way, human ingenuity is fueled by energy also; so, considering that 80% of energy is derived from fossil fuels it would not be very unexpected news to find out that Peak Human Ingenuity, or Peak Science will take place in time just when fossil fuel production is at its peak.

    So, is Peak Oil here? Although abundant evidence existed in order to prove that conventional Peak Oil happened between 2004 and 2007, the IEA (International Energy Agency), widely recognized as the most credible source on statistics about the international oil market, finally admitted in its 2010 World Energy Outlook that we’ve reached conventional Peak Oil back in 2006. They state : “Crude oil output reaches an undulating plateau of around 68-69 mb/d by 2020, but never regains its all-time peak of 70 mb/d reached in 2006, while production of natural gas liquids (NGLs) and unconventional oil grows strongly.” Then, the IEA strangely predicts that “Global oil production reaches 96 mb/d in 2035 on the back of rising output of natural gas liquids & unconventional oil, as crude oil production plateaus“. How is that possible? How can fields yet to be developed or to be found maintain the undulating plateau of crude oil at about 68-69 mb/d until 2035, when in fact we’ve already passed the peak discovery of oil in 1964? Today’s new oil field discoveries are as rare as hen’s teeth compared to the ones in the past, so how could IEA fill this funny graph with so much undiscovered oil? They actually can’t, so they try to put their best feet forward and hope for something…

    Even so, the future of energy can look bright! We, society as a whole, need a major change of attitude. We need a shift of perspective from the selfish, individualistic, and social-status-acquiring way of life towards a more altruistic one. Yes, we don’t have any energy left to meet our exaggerated selfishness but we have plenty of it in order to save the “global tribe“.

  • ReligionIsntAllBad

    Imightberiding, the problem with producing ethanol in quantities to meet the demand of our economy in North America ... is that you are now offsetting the high cost of gasoline with a higher cost of food. Your gas is cheaper, but now corn is more expensive .... and corn is an input for EVERYTHING basically from soda pop to roast beef. Your idea is not a bad one, it just isnt as effective as it first seems.

  • Ron

    @Waldo
    You read your own emotions into what people print.

    You have no proof of what you say. These technologies are being developed and Chevron in particular is doing a lot of work and expenditure on the subject.

    With more people like you on the planet we would all need meds. Fortunatley you are a "little person" minority.

    And if you have never had someone tell you to go to ---- in a calm and assertive manner...consider it done.

  • Ron

    @efanton.

    I have lived and worked in the Gulf region as I said. Qatar, UAE and will soon be in Saudi arabia. I am telling you that what is said about these cultures is true. They will invent nothing or guide the world out of nothing and in the end they will control nothing. I thought this to be one of the most enlightening Doc's on the subject that I have seen.

    It appears all any of you can do is go to a 3 year old level and call people names. Makes me really glad to be me and not you.

  • awful-truth

    A good ducumentary, but here is a reality check for everyone. Oil is used to create almost everything and we have nothing to replace it with regardless of alternative energy. You will never have 800 million electric cars because each tire requires 7 gallons of oil, not to mention all the plastic, resins, insecticides, etc, etc, etc that we have become so comfortable with. Solar will always be the best chance but in the end all the replacement technologies will be bought out by the same people that own everything right now. (Rothschild family estimated value - 500 Trillion dollars)

    This does not include the Rockerfellers, Warbergs, etc. Take the richest man in the world, Bill Gates, Warren Buffet,(whoever it is at the moment)and you soon discover they are little pricks in the big pond of dicks! This is not an attack on anyone other then human stupidity. There is nothing efficient about humanity as a whole and all the hope in the world will not change the final outcome. Ultimately, neccesity is the mother of invention, not human ingenuity. When all is said and done, only when we are forced to solve a problem do we acquire answers, and in this case, it will take a population drop of 95 percent and a world of hell before the general masses even attempt to understand the bill of goods they have been sold is bull**** which should be used to power everything because we will never run out it!

  • Jaybee

    @Ron: I, like you, have been to many places and come into contact with many different peoples and cultures as well. The impression I got of Americans in particular was that they will invent a lot, they will strive to guide the world, and they will want to control a lot and they will control a lot.....but it will all be in the pursuit of certain interests such as profit and they will willingly...I repeat....willingly trample on values, family as a unit, social ethics and community to do it...things these cultures you decry never will which maintains a sense of humanity in them.

    But that's my impression. I'm just one person, and not qualified in the least to judge or generalize whole cultures....exactly the same situation I guess you are in but dont accept.

  • Jaybee

    And a general comment on the documentary....this is very naive! I agree with the meat of it in terms of oil and its threats but its just the way Freedman goes about explaining why the Western countries are good with their democracy and their own values and these Asian countries and others with oil are horrid. It belies many assumptions in the background that he and many other commentators tend to have. If some historical processes and waves have led to the West reaching a certain standard and their social values reflect it, why then do things such as indiscriminate invasion of Iraq over the lie of WMDs happen and now there's no accountability for the country that did it? Saddam's Iraq invaded Kuwait and it was shown the might of international justice wasnt it? Why aren't the invaders of Iraq seeing that now? How has the "responsible" and "progressive" and "egalitarian" democratic society of the West allowed for such a travesty to happen? Why is there inherent partiality in the world from WTO negotiations (agricultural subsidies) to Iran being questioned for nuclear pursuits when Israel has it already and nobody wants to push it to make it official and sign treaties? Please....you can call it development, you can cloak it as logical, you can tout it as in the best interests of the globe, in the case of Ron above (who feels Middle Eastern cultures he pointed out are backward when actually the Arabs have historically invented a lot, even "teaching" Europe in Spain) you can call it an inherent cultural thing....in actuality this appears to be utter and flagrant hypocrisy. Edward Said was a true visionary, Orientalism and "the other" pervades mainstream thought even today.

  • Diamond Girl

    Imightberiding:
    I too am fascinated my the case of Brazil, it really does give me hope! Thanks for being a ray of sunshine in a room full of gloom lol!

  • Benny

    What a load of c@#$!!! This documentary is c@#$ and bias!! From the racist people that brought you Geert Wilders and other propaganda pieces, everybody is just pi$$ed off Russia and China might be muscling in on the world stage and their allies (Venezuela, Iran, Brazil and others) are changing the political dynamic.
    Luka said it best 'THE PRICE OF OIL IS CONTROLLED BY THE USA BY THE MEANS OF SAUDI DICTATORSHIP', now the Saudis have competition everybody doesn't like the change. If you cant control these countries invade them. Oh sorry we've already done that with Iraq.

    Whats even more comical is that all the 'experts' in here are incredibly intelligent liars. Oil isnt just restricted to transit but to also production of goods, pharmaceuticals and agri-products.

    What a silly example of an 'informative' documentary.

  • niko tha man

    Geothermal energy is an ultra efficient and an endless energy source the core of the earth won't cool , cold fusion is also very interesting and can make sea water into fuel for cars and home, sea water is an endlessly renewable resource.
    also electric cars can be wirelessly charged
    look up the wireless transfer of energy, nikola tesla and wardenclyffe tower

    all of this information is available though alien scientist on youtube check it out

    We HAVE to get these oil companies and world leaders in the know" so they can create an appropriate curriculum for our children to learn how to create a new 0 emission power grid
    it will be cheap and endless the people will have more power,

  • forthetimebeing

    here's something, not from inventers of current big thing, the potential of which is really understated:

    "Earlier this month, New Energy Technologies, Inc. announced that its engineering teams are continuing the development of novel SolarWindow(TM) technology, capable of generating electricity on see-thru glass windows, have achieved an important research breakthrough which could lead to improved efficiency, lower production costs and enhanced future commercial manufacturability of SolarWindow(TM).

    New Energy's SolarWindow(TM) technology -- capable of generating electricity on see-thru glass windows -- is currently under development for potential application in the estimated 5 million commercial buildings in America (Energy Information Administration) and more than 80 million single detached homes.

    Additionally, scientists developing the Company's first-of-its-kind MotionPower(TM) systems for generating electricity by capturing otherwise wasted kinetic energy of decelerating cars and trucks, such as at toll-booths, drive-thrus, stops signs, and truck weigh stations."

    With imagination and will, there's a way.

  • tara_11

    hugely disappointing! it essentially comes down to one idea, i.e. that "dubious" governments are using their energy resoures to pursue their dubious objectives..well the main idea is hardly a revelation..
    moral objections aside, this is a policy choice of sovereign states. and it sort of makes sense. as the russian guy has put it, u gotta use what u ve got. i find condemning such policies rather hypocritical in the world where war is often used as a policy instrument.

    whether one agrees with its main point or not, this film is a rather useless little piece of the documentary genre. it offers very few hard facts and lacks any perspective; the attitude is extremely biased. the whole approach of dividing the world into two opposing camps (i.c. "oil junkies" and "pushers") is old-fashioned, paranoid and hardly constructive. im very sad to encounter this kind of rhetoric in a post cold war world..not to mention the commentator's disturbingly strong dutch accent.

    save your time!

  • Superluminary

    In order to replace Oil as a power source in the world, you would need a Solar Panel roughly the same size as France. We would also need to figure out how to store, transport and distribute that energy, and in a world where Oil demand exceeds supply, we would have to impliment all of this with no global economy and a lack of resources.

    Even if we pulled this off, any solution to the Oil power problem, doesnt replace oil's use in things like agriculture, paints, fabrics, plastics, the list goes on, and on, and on.

    I am sure the human mind will come up with some fantastic ideas in the very near future regarding energy, but none of it will be able to maintain the Oil Age or its way of life that we've all grown up in.

    Look into peak oil, and dont stop until you put all the pieces together.

    I warn you though, for some ignorance is bliss.

    God i sound like Morpheus with the red and blue pills! lol

  • Superluminary

    Yes my friend! I saw this only last week and have been trying to get people to watch it. Chris Martenson is a great man.

  • 0zyxcba1

    @ Superluminary

    Oil is used for so many things. Even if we had limitless free electricity, we sill couldn't fly jet aircraft, or any aircraft, save hot-air balloons. Then there are fertilizers, medicines, ALL plastics. Look around you, wherever you are right the instant... look around you and then try to imagine how what you see, now, would look like absent oil.

    Everybody thinks oil is used for cars. Period. Nothing could be further from the truth. We are in the Oil Age. Past civilizations are characterized as the Stone Age, the Iron Age, the Bronze Age... we are the Oil Age. We depend upon oil for just everything!

    That is the problem. It really is. We cannot live without oil!

    What are we going to do?

    0z

  • http://twitter.com/UncleArty1 Uncle Arty

    however everything you just mentioned has petroleum free alternatives, hemp alone can replace nearly every application where we're currently being forced to use oil for

  • http://twitter.com/UncleArty1 Uncle Arty

    however everything you just mentioned has petroleum free alternatives, hemp alone can replace nearly every application where we're currently being forced to use oil for

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Terry-Beaton/100000940529089 Terry Beaton

    That almost sounds intelligent! Disturbingly Dutch accent?...huh?

  • rumbumm

    Everything is just a question of price. People will use alternative fuel, when it is cheaper then oil. And I don't believe, that the time comes, until the price is under 200$ per barrel.

  • DIMOJABE

    If there was ever a video that needed to be shown in the USA - this is it.