The Forgotten Man

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The Forgotten Man

Second only to Julian Assange, Bradley Manning is the most important figure in the Wikileaks controversy; his is alleged to have handed over hundreds of thousands of secret US war files and diplomatic cables.

But, while the world watches Assange's trial with bated breath, Manning is already wasting away in solitary confinement; this is the story of his daring intelligence heist.

We hear the only recording of Bradley Manning's voice and we listen to the logs of alleged conversations with the man who ultimately betrayed him.

It's a case that has all the hallmarks of a spy thriller. Bradley Manning was a U.S. soldier serving in Iraq, when he allegedly downloaded classified files onto a disk storing Lady Gaga songs. It's alleged he then confided what he'd done to a computer hacker. A short time later the authorities arrested Manning and he's been in a military jail ever since.

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Ratings: 9.08/10 from 52 users.
  • dewflirt

    Adrian Lmao is a grass.

  • wald0

    "The United States strongly condemns the illegal disclosure of classified information. It puts peoples life in danger, threatens our national security..."

    Oh b.s.!!! it exposes the lies they want to keep hidden from the American people and the rest of the world. No one's life was put in danger from a single cable that was released, we have not heard of a single death or injury in any way linked to this disclosure. Adrian Lamo is the real worm in this story. He didn't do what he did out of some ignor@nt, misguided sense of patriotism, he wanted his five minutes, that is why he went to the news organization he went to, not because he was scared. If he was scared he would have kept his mouth shut. If he was so concerned with national security he would have kept his mouth shut about the whole incident to anyone other than the government officials he reported it to. Instead he exposes the whole incident to a news organization and now does a documentary, using his own name and image, for the world to see- yeah, he seems terrified and real concerned about national security (LOL). He is a worm, period.

    Bradley Manning is my hero, he acted on principle putting his neck on the line for what he believed in so we could all see real evidence of what our armed forces were doing in Iraq- which was worse than most could have ever believed if not for this video. I don't know why he confided in a worm like Lamo, it sounded like he was second guessing his actions and looking for support from Lamo that he had done the right thing. Well, in my opinion you did the right thing Bradley I'm just sorry you have to pay the way you do for doing it.

  • https://apps.facebook.com/dwdapps/ DigiWongaDude

    Manning could become the Mandela of our age, as the hypocrites convicting him as the criminal are no longer tolerated for the blood on their own hands. It's a sad fact that a man's life must be wasted, again, while the world's abhorrence gains traction. U.S. President Manning? Mandela was a 'terrorist' didn't you know? Same sh*t different era. Let the boy go free or meet your nemesis.

  • Imightberiding

    What you said.

  • Geoffrey Grekin

    Yeah, I have to agree Lamo was is defiantly a snake in the grass, there's no way he thought that he had to do something for the protection of national security (giving up Manning) while at the same time fearing that the same government he was confiding in was also going to detain him because of this same information.
    It just doesn't add up.

    But Manning although a courageous source deserves some of the blame for his incarceration.
    Although one could argue hes paid for his mistake and some. He nevertheless, despite all the work that was done by Wiki Leaks to protect him as a source, sunk himself by telling Lamo everything.

    The whole structure and philosophical principal of wiki leaks was to prevent this type of thing from happening at all because it allows sources to maintain their anonymity. However this protection of the source can only go so far, if the sources unwittingly reveals their own actions, as in the case of Manning, then they must inevitably live with the consequences of doing so.

    Finally, although the federal government leaked secrets are atrocious Their treatment of Manning is ironically understandable in a self-preserving way. In order for the United states government to maintain their dominance they need to have secrecy and knowledge tightly controlled, all those like Manning must be made an example of in order to persuade others from attempting to instigate similar intelligence leaks. Now whether you agree that US government should remain dominant at all is debatable but its actions are sound.

    I feel sorry for Manning, he made a huge mistake and will most likely live with the consequences for the remainder of his life.

  • Geoffrey Grekin

    Also I total disagree with Daniel Domscheit-Berg point of view, and others that feel that Manning is a greater "hero" than Julian.

    Julian Assange, may be a clandestine individual, but he has made himself a public figure to promote an idea and avenue in which sources can remain anonymous. He willingly puts his neck on the line so that other sources afraid of prosecution are given a chance to release to the public classified information.

    Although Manning is a somewhat courageous source, no doubt about it, his courage only extends so far.
    Had Manning truly been a courageous hero surpassing Julian in the principles of truth, he would have leaked the source publicly without though or consequence for his own well being in much the same way Daniel Ellsburg did during the Vietnam war.
    Instead he used Wiki leaks to remain anonymous, and was only caught because he second guessed himself, or wanted vindication and told an untrustworthy source.
    He's a tragic figure, but heroically courageous he is not.

  • bubascary

    Hi DigiWongaDude, I didn't think you were posting comments anymore, due to your radio gig, or I got it very wrong and am embarrassing myself. Always enjoyed your comments some more than others and some flew way over my head. Nice to see you back anyways.

  • Timmy Poo

    Manning is a true patriot.

  • Timmy Poo

    The truth is now a crime.

  • https://apps.facebook.com/dwdapps/ DigiWongaDude

    Many thanks for that Buba, it came at just the right time too - have had one of those dreaded moments we all, sadly, have to endure. But I was never far away. Observation can be a more powerful enabler than participation, if only for a time. The 'radio gig' is evolving...nay, I am evolving... which is fortunate since it's getting harder and harder to keep up. ... and then I think of Bradley Manning.

  • https://apps.facebook.com/dwdapps/ DigiWongaDude

    You make some decent counter arguments Geoffrey, no denying that. But the clues to the contradictory truths are in your own words - having thought considerably about them. If I can paraphrase ever so slightly - "understandable in a self-preserving way, in order for the United states government to maintain their dominance they need to have secrecy and knowledge tightly controlled."

    1) They didn't 'tightly' control it. If it hadn't been Bradley it would invariably have been someone else at some point, given the laxness of the networks. (The buck stops right there - he's a Private, with a psychological disorder, for crying out loud).

    2) Comprehensible it may be, but understandable it is not, for one leads to the other (dominance and secrecy) in propping up the charade. It may be morally comprehensible to have secrets, for sure, but under these circumstances they are wholly there to prevent the darkness coming in to light.

    "I feel sorry for Manning, he made a huge mistake..." - I don't think Manning would thank you for your pity - it is, in part, what is keeping him where he is. What he needs is your outrage. Without it, the 'system' that binds him is unhindered in its consent to do so. Therein comes my reply.

  • http://twitter.com/AbsolutLight Unity

    ^^ Last paragraph nails the problem. Generally, people enjoy being the bystanders, watch from the audience as the scene unfolds. Kind of how a movie works, you watch as things develop, you don't participate, and everybody has an opinion. Involvement is the key.

  • http://www.facebook.com/glen.hale2 MalOdour

    And USSA wonder why no one like them. They have not won a war since WW2

  • https://plus.google.com/u/0/109863372757742722435/posts Deborah Macaoidh Selim

    Bradley Manning is not forgotten and will never be forgotten as long as I and my descendants are alive on this earth (maybe places other than Earth one day, too).

    There is a worldwide revolution going on and he played a key role. He changed to way we look at each other and our governments. I hope it will continue to play out in my lifetime, even if i never see much of the results. A few years ago, i wouldn't have thought it was possible, but I have hope for humanity again. Those who support him and the cause of Wikileaks and the free press are on the right side of history.

    Thank you, Mr. Manning! I'm sorry you won't be able to transition in private like you wanted. That was a huge sacrifice, especially now that LGBT rights are such an issue and you many not be able to enjoy those rights yourself for awhile. We will be eternally grateful!

  • http://www.facebook.com/harry.nutzack.1 Harry Nutzack

    Manning is no more a "hero" than any other whistle blower. I suspect those of you that praise him so heavily never actually read those files. He deliberately sacrificed his freedom, and the largest revelation was "shooting team spike" had about the worst drivers on the planet. No cat was released from any bag. He reacted idiotically to video footage he saw without context, and now will spend a very long time considering the intelligence of his actions. Please explain to me where his "Heroism" comes into play, I must have blinked or something.

  • https://apps.facebook.com/dwdapps/ DigiWongaDude

    I would say his hero status comes not from what he did, but from the tragedy that he has become. F. Scott Fitzgerald would no doubt agree - "Show me a hero and i'll write you a tragedy." I'll give you that he is a victim of his own stupidity, but that doesn't make him less of a hero. Indeed if he had stopped to think about himself a little more, there's no way he would have had the balls to do what he did. Stupid or brave, it really makes no difference. Hero or not, the longer they lock him up the more legendary history will make him. If they released him tomorrow with a slap on the wrist...he'll be tomorrow's fish supper wrappings. So he's a hero, perhaps, because he's tragic.

  • john Palermo

    Honor-trader-espionage, Words that when used with scorn have the irrational ability to sanctify the villains and vilify the saints. FBM

  • Shannon L

    When there is corruption it should be revealed. They do NOT give us privacy period and we have to pay for our crimes..we pay their salaries...why is this information private? It should not be period. They should be answering to US the public and if they have corruption we need to know about it and they must be treated the same way they treat us. No favor, no mercy, tried for their crimes. This crap goes on in Iraq etc everyday. They kill, rape etc innocent people and normal citizens. We have no right to be there period.