A Grain of Sand

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Ratings: 8.19/10 from 36 users.

Storyline

A Grain of SandThis is the story of one man and an island. Brendon Grimshaw purchased the island in 1962 and set about making the island habitable. He did this with the help of one other man, Rene Antoine Lafortune.

Brendon Grimshaw, a British national, was editor to some of the most important newspapers in Africa. But in 1972, he gave it all up to go and live on Moyenne Island, which he purchased for ten thousand pounds.

In the thirty-six-years that he has lived on the island, Brendon and his friend, Rene Lafortune, planted sixteen-thousand trees, built 4,8 kilometers of nature paths, and brought and bred 109 giant land tortoises, creating an island of incredible beauty now worth 34 million Euros.

Come with us on this journey and discover why an 82-year-old man fears his island will one day be destroyed. Produced by Wandering Eye Productions.

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Comments and User Reviews

  • http://www.facebook.com/tony.rozycki Tony Rozycki

    Wonder if he's tempted to issue his own postage stamps?

  • Jayjay30

    they should have a law there that prohibits the buying or selling of that island and have a guardian/employee paid for by the tourist .

  • PaulGloor

    I want one !
    Question 1... Why do you need a swimming pool on an island ?
    Question 2... $50,000 a year to run an island with nothing on it ? sounds more like a keep away fee.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_ZMK6YNWJACHQ5CRCJW5TNYFURI KsDevil

    Money comes and money goes, but nature is forever.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/U6QWIMU37O6LUVLOCTDL7ICV3Y Dean

    Inspiring & refreshing. A true super hero that gives me hope for humanity.

  • http://www.facebook.com/daveewer David Ewer

    Very interesting and moving film - thanks, we both enjoyed. This is worth watching for the tortoises alone!

  • antiloops

    well is for sure a blessing story but I felt that was some missing links there... how do you get so easily your hands on a island ?? what people you need know for be in such position ?? if he want so much good for this place why he don't leave it wild and free of humans ??

    Just saying !!

  • PavolvsBitch

    Wisdom in action. Each of us can produce such self sustainable (i.e. natural) enhancements whereby no harm is done. This is our purpose in being here. Not to be locked into a metalic cage in outrage to wombmankind, nature and whatever created all of it. Science is the demonic tool through which defiance of natural order is made manifest and the 'scientific experts' are no more than whores promoting the new gods for this new religion of destruction.

  • Teddy Mcd

    ...and his own currency -'Island Fed'

  • PavolvsBitch

    The most beautiful islands have long been commandeered as military playgrounds. As long as we are prepared to endure and obey military rule, we shall have the fruits of warfare. As long as we enable our currencies to be controlled by military strategists, we shall have disease, hunger, plague and death. It is not in response to a growing population that these endless towers are constructed, but in reaction to an insane detrimental economic system which builds and destroys it's empiric base at will. Together, of course with all in the way of 'economic growth' Sustainability, Equality and Diversity Kills, OK.

  • PavolvsBitch

    that's the problem with being 'man love boy friday'; no progeny to carry on the inheritance. oh a UN foundation! You don't get that status without a heavy price. He could easily drawn up an EPA to futher his interest; he's an intelligent man.

    As soon as 'Foundation' is flagged, the island will, in time, be over run with pervs. Way it goes down with the UN. Only the wealthy can afford the rates and they became wealthy through furthering the agenda of UN policies in ripping off the Common Wealth, killing or enslaving the common people and cutting off huge sections of Earth where they may not enter. People were happy and healthy and FREE in their huts, you klutz! What price improvement, when only the rich who gain profits from destroying nature, can afford to appreciate it.

  • PavolvsBitch

    this is madness, this argument for 'benefitting the economy and environment as an economic profit centre'. The money of rich people will ensure that they continue to invest in Monsanto, BP, Warfare. Just because it's profitable to something called 'the economy' (rich man's club) in no way justifies their position. This man will be taken out unless he complies. That's what happens when an individual builds something of real worth; the mafia come calling with their big guns. As they say, no man is an island. But perhaps that's the lie; as each wombman is an island with boundaries, customs, unique characteristics and PRIVACY from invasion, intrusion with strong defences against pyracy and destruction. No place in a hive mind 'utopian' playgrounds for the criminal rich.

  • Rocky Racoon

    He will probably be underwater in another 20 years many of these islands are going to disappear due to the arctic ice melt thanks to global warming so there is no getting away. I know if i was a billionaire I would have a bunker somewhere fully loaded to last a few centuries with everything from hydroponics to nuclear power if I could get it which I am sure with that kind of money I could. We are pretty close to the end. Canada did not have a winter this year and I am 57 years old our fruit tree harvest and others is not going to happen I wonder how many other food crops were destroyed this year with early bloom then a frost and I can well imagine the heat this year. I doubt if we will have a blue sky all summer with all the chem trails. They stopped spraying 2 weeks before Christmass last year....and from now on everyday no matter how hot always overcast skies. Not good.
    RR

  • Peter Wilson

    The world's perverse state of affairs originates with the perversion of language. Am I the only one who noticed the mangled use of the word "privatization" at the beginning? Developers utilizing corrupt government-partnered banks and their phoney debt based currencies (at the expense of honest hardworking local populations on such islands and abroad) has nothing to do with private ownership. Brendon Grimshaw, on the other hand, is an example of true private ownership! The miraculous element at play in the story is that his PRIVATE OWNERSHIP RIGHTS were respected all those years. Institutional (governmental or corporate/governmental) trespass, control and destruction of local peoples' property rights (what rights?) is what the documentarians are referring to at the start of this film---true private ownership (and others' respect for it) was the blessing that made Moyenne Island the spectacle it is today.

  • Jack1952

    Over the last three days, in my section of Canada, we have had incredibly clear blue skies. Is this overcast to start tomorrow? Maybe I'll check the weather station.

    Well, I've checked. Clear blue skies tomorrow but chance of thunderstorms in the evening and on Tuesday. Sunny with cloudy periods for the rest of the week. You could be right. The weather channel supports your prediction...at least for the short term.

  • PavolvsBitch

    The IMF private banking mafia always extract their pound of flesh in interest inflated loans; old as the hills, worldwide genocide. I wonder if Brendon is at peace with the new arrangement; would have been interesting to catch up with him a couple of years on. what he achieved is inspiring, useful and above all, natural.

  • Guest

    Beautiful DOC....a+
    When Brendon got the island, life trusted him with it. He now has to trust that he can find the right person to pass it on. I say don't sell it, give it, it was never really yours anyway. Do it before you die. No one can decide anything for this island while he is alive and no one could decide anything for this island if and when he finds the right new owner.
    He does say at the beginning of the doc something in the line of The island has a mind of it's own. Prove it to yourself!
    az

  • Guest

    Why is it that i can't start this documentary somewhere in the middle? Is there a trick?
    az

  • sknb

    Fantastic Documentary. This is why I keep coming to this website.

    Beautiful and Powerful. Interesting and Meaningful.

  • Oliver Smith

    I totally disagree with one thing he said... He is not a normal guy! He is an amazing guy!!!...and we need more of them!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    What a blinding watch... cheers TDF and cheers Brendan ;-)

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Ionica-Doimetri/100001518733430 Ionica Doimetri

    switch to html5 player. on vimeo page there is a little button on lower right

  • Imightberiding

    Brilliant doc... indeed, Brendon Grimshaw is most certainly a man I would very much like to meet.

  • Jack1952

    A great watch. I don't understand why there can't be room for both economic development and for this island as it is. I know there are speculators who are salivating over the projected profits to be made from developing this place, but I'm sure he could sell this property with the provision that it not be changed. It would be in the best interests of the Seychelles and their eco-tourist economy to maintain areas of a pristine nature.

    I have to admit that when he mentioned the mahogany trees he planted the first thing I thought of was how beautiful the wood is and what I would love to make with it. Working with wood and making small furniture has been a hobby of mine. Using mahogany in rough construction would be a waste. It is best suited for the smaller and finer items that we prize. However, on this island, it would be best to just let the trees grow and only use the wood if a trees dies of natural causes.

  • zaphodity

    Development my ass !!!..How would you like it if some greedy bureaucrats wanted to tear down your home and build a back packer hostel or a caravan park ? No friggin' way man. Get it heritage listed, turned into a national park or something, anything but a high priced flop house for the rich people of the world.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/NTCAMGDXJKMTD5EED77VMMJIMA Warren Gates

    Pretty soon, perhaps the nature of the island will become more desirable than some commercial development and both parties can be satisfied.

  • http://www.facebook.com/james.baker.5623 James Baker

    i was really looking forward to watching this until the makers kept cutting Brendan. the 2 most interesting subjects (Brendan and the island) had very little to do with the whole thing and the majority was a bunch of other un interesting talking heads and a pointless school visit.

    what about Lafortune??? i wanted to hear about how he achieved it, trials and tribulations.....PIRATE GRAVES!!! politicians do not capture my imagination. More about some of the other species he introduced, maybe about some that didnt work.

    i understood the underlying message of conservation but this should have been last but not least. really felt like the makers were totally undermining and if i was Brendan i'd be a little insulted.

  • Leslie

    How can you put a price tag or dollar value on having your own island surrounded by nature. I wouldn't have guessed one could find your own island anymore. I'm drooling, I would disappear and never have been seen again if I had the chance, of course friends would always be welcome & my cats would have to adjust :)

  • Guest

    Moyenne is not on many of the Sechelle's map but i found it on one and it seem to be connected by a bank to two other islands named Round and Long islands, Moyenne and them are all neighbours of Mahe Islands.
    Still the dream of a deserted island sound very romantic.
    I was raised on the south shore of the St Lawrence River in Quebec 40 minutes from Montreal. Right in front of our house one could see a few islands. I remember in my youth seeing horses on them, a place people grew asparagus and then later realizing some people grew pot on them.
    A ride on a boat circling these islands at sunset gave you the impression you had suddenly enter a paradise.
    az

  • dewflirt

    Az, I'm booking a corner of your island. Don't need much, a hut and a light and I'll be fine. And a bathroom, world peace, a horse, chocolate cake and something shiny. It's my birthday in August, need to practice my list ;)

  • Guest

    A friend of mine owns an island right accross from Vercheres, he is a farmer. He grows buckwheat, winter and summer wheat and other grains. He would gladly let you pitch a tent and land you his kitchen to make any desserts you wish, no horses though but a bike and August is one of the best month to be there...just before harvest.
    One night i got left there by myself, i had asked a boat man to drop me off on the island, thinking my friend was at home but he was away and i had no boat to return to mainland. I sat on the shore at night and made the biggest fire, while i was enjoying my aloneness, someone came to see what was going on. They thought it was a call for help.
    az

  • Leslie

    Sounds like a peaceful, safe place to grow up. My favorite outfit is tank, shorts and bare feet (suntan of course). I'm a diver or was until Fukishima & the oil spills, I think the Indian ocean is actually one of the Oceans left that is what I consider dive-able (except I think this one is known to have lots of sharks). I've dove with them as well but not Tigers, they are brutal. I grew up in CA, moved around a bit and came back, now it is sad, we usually travel outside US during the summer but the oil spill and Fukishima have basically ruined the Oceans nearby, not to mention, who wants to be groped by TSA.
    The last trip we took I finally got my son certified.
    I'm still drooling, I didn't even finish the whole video, I don't have to, I know what happens to the locals when big $ moves in, the locals get priced out of having affordable living available then they have to leave. I can't imagine the impact on the local people and environment when the hotels are built, the waste produced alone I am sure is a great burden & I know from observation what piggish slobs people can be when they are on vacation, they think they earned it. Lalala ok I'll stop now, I know it was hard work to make the Island what it is but what luck, it's nice to see it turned out the way it did, I wonder what kind of trouble there is on the Island, poisons spiders, etc.? I want to go diving......I wonder what will happen whenif this whole pole shift happens?

  • Guest

    I worked as a travel agent in San Diego some years ago, the girl who was the scuba expert at the agency, her last name was Beach...your post brought her smile back to my mind.
    az

  • capdanks30

    Why can't the have tenting on the island with no alcohol or nosie rules.Then the common man and family can view nature.It should not cost 2000 a night.40 is enough to support the island.

    Put the tents up on platforms.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=647058614 Will Coles

    Take a look at it on Google Earth & you'll see what can happen to it so easily!

    The neighbouring island a few hundred metres away has been 'developed' for cabins with connecting roads tearing down at least a quarter of the trees & shrubs. All three of the surrounding islands have resorts & restaurants (!) on them & have very little tree cover.

    Very sad that every island must be owned & tamed by someone & not allowed to just exist or be a sanctuary for nature from man.

  • durruti1936

    Anyone concerned with the fate of this island may want to check out the Hawaiian sovereignty movement. Indigenous Hawaiians have been forced to the peripherals of their own homeland, most family's eek out a meager existence living in poverty. Hawaiians make very little money off the tourist trade, while major hotels and resorts capitalize off the low wages paid to natives. While wealthy people develop million dollar houses they simultaneously drive up the price of land, and they ensure that Hawaii will never belong to Hawaiians. Hawaiians have occupied beaches in Oahu and won 45 acres from the state to live traditionally and to open their own school in order teach the Hawaiian language to their children, as well as their traditional way of life. I believe that an entire culture is worth more attention than a man and an island that could accommodate hundreds of refugees from third world conflicts. What gives any person the right to own more land than they need. We must focus on helping our brothers and sisters versus a novel idea of keeping an island pristine. Only our sense of humanity and solidarity with the dispossessed and most exploited of this world will bring about progress. Please stand with the native Hawaiians in their struggle to reclaim their culture, heritage, and existence.

  • Leslie

    Glad I brought you a smile :)

  • Leslie

    Considering you can fit everyone on the planet in Texas, I don't see why anyone needs to be thinking of doing anything of the sort. your way of thinking is along the lines of Agenda 21, they want to strip us all of our rights to own land, re-forest most of the planet and let us all live like sardines, stacked and packed on top of each other, oh wait, us as in you and me, they will roam as they please on most of the planet that will be off limits to us. We will be completely controlled and surrounded by buffer zones. We wont even have control of our air, food or water supplies or what chemicals they put in it. My first statement is not an argument for defending overpopulation, that has to do with resources.

    Agenda 21 is here, it is worldwide and they aren't compensating when they confiscate your property. Youtube, the UN website and your local planning dept has all the info, your local planning dept is where you can join in the effort to stop this before it gets out of hand.

    Your comment tells me you belong in a socialist community, please find one and don't try to impose this in a "FREE" society.

  • johnnyride12

    az i am with you-the best thing would be to give it to someone-if he sold it he would be selling more than just the island-if he gives it to someone he is gaining more than he could ever imagine!

  • Leslie

    I looked into the status of the Island a bit more, it seems it already has a restaurant on it now, but no mention of the owner passing. That seems strange, no? Wish the guy had email, lol, I'd be happy to continue where the owner leaves off when he passes and just be allowed to live my life their, under whatever provisions w/o ever seeking actual ownership as long as my right to stay as long as I don't disobey the wishes of the owner was guaranteed. I know I am dreaming, I don't do this often. :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1582927291 SavannahVegan Kronson Bach

    I can listen to this guy for hours .... what a genuine, wonderful soul. What a special and blessed journey he has been allowed to travel in his life. Truly marvellous to see a little bit of good being done in such a selfish and destructive world.

  • Leslie

    It's in national park status now, I am certain this means it will or is actually property of the UN, the UN of all things, unbelievable, they will not have his wishes at heart in the future, I think he spent too much time away from civilization, surely if he knew what was happening in the world, the UN would be the last to be entrusted with this earthly heaven.

  • Guest

    Leslie, you never know...he may be hiring. The guy is in great shape according to everything i've found on the subject but he may need a little help.
    I know there has to be thousands of people who could continue exactly in the line of his dream and one of them is the right one, the same way that he was the right one when it happened for him.
    Forget e-mails, doesn't sound like his way of communication according to his life style. Write him a long long long convincing beautiful to the point letter and include a little magic in it!
    az

  • Guest

    is this johnnyjohnny from Thailand?
    az

  • Guest

    Don't enter fear...interfere with the flow of what has to be. Didn't he say the island has a mind of it's own? If you think you may be the right person, you have to have the right perception. Fear is our biggest, most verocious personal enemy!
    When in deep water, become a fish...you, of all people, would know that one.
    az

  • johnnyride12

    hi its johnny from whistler -dont think we have met before-I am high in the sky with my spirit so i have become a bird even though in truth i am a wolf! i read a poem you wrote recently after a documentary and was so inspired i wrote one too-wanted to say thank you very much for opening up a portal that i could slip through-i owe you something inspirational and hope i can repay your unknowing kindness! which i believe is the best kind of kindness! hey what you write cries out kindness like a loon at night when you are camping-hard not to notice and every fiber of me is attune to this so to me its more like a super loud jazz show when you are camping! Wow birds wolves poetry portals loons camping and a jazz show-just goes to show ya how good documentaries can be.... peacelove-j

  • Guest

    1 live dot
    from under
    a dot is an extremely compressed o
    .
    an o inside an O
    is a pupil for an iris
    from dot to O
    Opera by azilda
    az

  • Jayjay30

    That island is not worth the billions that those so called investor/developers are offering. It's got a sentimental value which one can only experience once they visit it . As usual The so called developers want to put a price on the priceless.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/NEXTBIKH4BO5HLC3REIJ6FXQNA MD

    Just incredible and quite inspirational but just pray there is no oil beneath the Island

  • Leslie

    That is what I figured, spent 1/2 day looking for contact info but never found any. I have read he is kind of a pain in the butt in person, who knows, I'd give it a shot, really ownership isn't necessary.
    The most worrisome part is lots of info leads me to believe the Gov is totally corrupt.

  • Guest

    I bet if you wrote a letter, adressed it to his name above Moyenne Island Seychelle...it'll reach him hand in hand.
    You got to be a pain in butt when you want to protect an island. I've read he is quite pleasant and waves goodbye when people leave...lol

    Where were you favorite places to dive in so far?
    Would love to find someone to teach me someday, someone really patient as i have a fear of the depth of oceans.
    az

  • Cristi Vidrascu

    This guy lived the capitalist's dream: he used the capital he had (money but more importantly the human capital, that is, his skills, enthusiasm, and time) and he created something out of nothing, and made it productive. He did so without much government interference and bureaucracy, no norms on how many hours should be worked, etc. It's a shame these movie producers used this guy's work for their leftist propaganda, rather than focus on his story and that of the island. I only hope that private property rights will be respected, and after he dies, the successor will run the island according to Brendon's wishes, without all the city-dwelling environmentalists and do-gooders offering advice from their lofty places.

  • Leslie

    I might try it, I have started to question this pole shift and wonder what the temp on the Island will be after that happens, I really would hate the cold on a tropical island :) I have not abandoned the idea, I have many questions of course.

    The great thing about diving is in my experience most of the best stuff is actually 30-60ft, I got tricked into 100ft when I had made it clear I really had no desire to go that deep but it was ok.

    It is somewhat of a mind f%^k that you just have to decide if it is worth it or not. I have always felt that I would live my life and do what I wanted, if I limited my life due to fears, what kind of life is that? So, you always dive with a buddy but being that my husband does not dive, I have always ended up paired up with someone who usually is so far away, if an emergency arose, I'd have to grab the closest person instead but this is a given with diving and nobody is going to turn their back on a diver in distress, period!
    I also am led to believe, if you have to make a EMERGENCY exit, you (they call it singing) all the way to the top and as you rise, the compressed air in your lungs expands and you will discover you have a lot more air then you think? I don't know, I am happy to say, I never had to do that, I almost think it should be part of the training, only from a safe, non compression dive.

    Having said that, I find diving actually the most relaxing thing I have ever done, strange enough, you just have to face that fact **** happens and you know what to do. (dive classes)
    I feel it is best (if you decide to stick with it) to buy your own equipment and make sure it is inspected before each trip.

    I got hooked in Cancun but after the last hurricane it lost all it's color, the coral seems to have got covered in sand and I can't tell you if it is dead or alive, I think dead. I really want to dive Cozumel and the Indian Ocean, I live in CA but won't dive here especially after Fukishima and stay away from the oil spills.

    I loved Little Cayman, (I like warm water) Big Cayman was nice to.
    I was not impressed with Jamaica or Bahamas, Bahamas was a complete void of life disaster and I took a dive cruise, thank God the life on the boat and food made up for it.

    Honduras was ok, I went while the water was still a bit cold, I also got the worst case of food poisoning ever so what diving I did was nice.

  • Guest

    You never know, if the pole shift happen...Moyenne may become a high mountain where you'd be more protected than you think.
    Good diving stories....i hear Belize is good too.
    Diving with manta rays would possibly be the scariest thing but also the most amazing.
    az

  • sknb

    Only a few jewels of green left
    floating in the black oil ocean
    surrounded by the last drops of crystal blue
    birds singing
    birds screaming
    don't let it go
    don't let it go

  • Jack1952

    I take my grandson and we camp at the back of the family farm or we go to my sister's farm which has a stream and a large beaver pond and lots of trees. August is a good time since the biting bugs are not as numerous. Not exactly an island but still both places are isolated, quiet and beautiful.

  • dewflirt

    I prefer fresh water, feels more wet and refreshing to swim in it than the sea. Rivers, not lakes. Got to be clear and flowing. It's the isolation of the island that appealed to me, peace and quiet. You're right though, plenty of places to find that. Even long grass will lose you from sight, or the sights from you. Never really been good at beaches, don't like being hot or in bright light. Makes me grouchy and squinty :)

  • Jack1952

    Northern Canadian lakes, hundreds of thousands of them, water so clear you can't tell how far it is to the bottom...many of them not much bigger than a soccer pitch. Accessible only by air or an all terrain vehicle. Trails winding all over the place. Incredible peace and quiet. A couple of hours drive from where most Canadians live...even the largest cities. Although you don't like beaches, there are some amazing fresh water beaches on the Great Lakes. A great place for a winter walk.

    I have camped on islands on some of those small lakes. Those islands are overrun with mice. No predators. You can hear them scratching and scurrying around all night.

  • dewflirt

    Lake beaches are not at all like sea beaches, much fresher:) i spent a night on a veranda of what I thought was an empty house in Barcelona, woke to the sound of cars crunching on gravel and in the headlights saw two huge rats trying to eat my sleeping bag. Mice I don't mind, rats are not good. Not frightened of them, they're just horrid. The sea frightens me a bit, too deep and full of teeth :) Wales has some beautiful rivers for swimming and plenty of places to walk and camp, like a mini Canada :)

  • Achems_Razor

    "to deep and full of teeth" I don't know if you would like Okanagan lake our 90 mile long glacier lake in Kelowna BC. then, very, very deep, the home of Ogopogo, the legendary lake monster, sightings way back in time. Even made a doc on it with Leonard Nimoy.

  • dewflirt

    I've heard of ogopogo, same sort of thing as Nessy and Mokele Mbembe, don't think they eat people but I'm not keen to find out. Depths are like heights only worse, you can fall into them ;)

  • Jack1952

    Maybe that's why the phrase "depths of despair" is such an apt term. You can't see the menace so who can't know where it is. All you know is that it is there somewhere and you have no idea how to fight the unseen enemy. Deep and black and you are unable to touch bottom.

  • Jack1952

    Our discussion and this film demonstrates that there are still a lot of places on this planet that are incredibly beautiful. Instils hope for the future. Hope is good. Despair sucks.

  • dewflirt

    Just thinking about that makes me shudder, I can almost feel things nipping at my toes. When I was quite young I read an account of a chap that had survived a few days floating around in the sea, when they pulled him out he was severely nibbled. Passing fish had taken bites out of him. Lodged itself pretty firmly in my imagination. The more I think about the deep dark the more I don't like it. If that is despair....... Terrifying.
    To brighter things! It's true, the world is a truly stunning, awe inspiring place, lots of them dry and shallow. So glad to get to run around on it :)

  • Jack1952

    You're not going to like this story then. On the family farm there is a large pond with a dock. When I was in my early teens I would lay on the dock and put my hand in the water and let the mudcat (specie of catfish) nibble at my fingers. I would hold my thumb and forefinger about an inch apart and when a mudcat would try to pass through I would snatch it out of the water. Worked every time.

    One day, I was doing it and I could feel a great deal of nibbling for a minute but it suddenly stopped. Thinking it unusual, I looked down to see what was going on. To my horror, I saw a snapping turtle, about the size of a dinner plate. slowly advancing on my fingers with its mouth beginning to open. It was less than a foot from my hand and its intent was quite clear. I went from a prone position to standing upright in a flash. I still get the shudders when I think about it.

  • Achems_Razor

    Flirt...Ha, Ha, it is better than the fish nipping at other places, when in the Amazon never pee in the water, Amazon and Orinoco rivers, a little fish called Candirus (Vandella) will swim right up the urine stream fast, right into the urethra for men and up the urethra and other places for women.

    And can't get them out, have little barbed hooks on them, the most feared fish in the Amazon, better check your toilets, might have migrated. lol lol

  • dewflirt

    Thanks Jack, you and the Mighty Achem have done so much to allay my fears :/ I won't be hitting the water in anything less than chainmail and trampoline pants! Even in the crystal clear waters of the Dordogne I was thinking of pike and killer catfish. I am truly out of my element in water :)

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_LSUIYV4LD5LWI5Z7QJYNBEVU6Y Edward Honda

    the island needs more chicks

  • dewflirt

    Yeah, the whole place is overrun with worms :)

  • Alex Hanin

    Terrible documentary, terrible "director".

  • sknb

    I simply cannot imagine how you could think this was a terrible documentary. It was a beautiful story about an inspiring life and an interesting place. .....

  • http://www.facebook.com/pace.freeman Pace Freeman

    wonderful..... :-)

  • brutusaurio

    I would say terrific documentary, well directed.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Craig-Helgerson/100000463370811 Craig Helgerson

    Brendon has an awful big environmental "footprint" there...to contrast the island of "one" to a major city (of 500,000 - 1,000,000 residents seems like a manipulation of reality...I felt awful about how much habitat and vegetation was destroyed by one single individual. Seems like a means of being environmentally self righteous.

  • Micky Martin

    Good inspiration but bad direction.
    Give us a ******* tour of the island, tell us how Brendon managed to live alone on this island, what's does he eat and what are the survival skills?

  • Martin ciejek

    That's not answering the question they were trying to answer.

  • Dawkins

    I really liked this documentary, it hit a nerve. People destroy the planet in order to make money, money to buy things we think will bring happiness. I don't think you can buy happiness.

  • Jdove13

    Craig Helgerson: - "I felt awful about how much habitat and vegetation was destroyed by one single individual. Seems like a means of being environmentally self righteous."

    What are you talking about?
    Did you not listen to the bit where he talked about there not being hardly any trees on the island until they begun planting them? Then the birds arrived. Then they brought over Giant Tortoises which now live happily on the island away from the dangers of the rest of the world where they have become significantly endangered.

    When you do something like provide thousands of animals a natural habitat to live in, and refuse 24,000,000£ so that future generations might benefit, then you can say that this incredible man is being "self righteous".

    Fantastic little documentary. Not brilliantly directed unfortunately. Would loved to have known a little more about Brendon's lifestyle, what he eats, his daily routine etc. But those guys are young. Hopefully they can do a follow up doc in a few years.

  • charlies1978

    doc trying to make a bigger point than that,if you cant see that you part of the proplem

  • abner holtiton

    i feel sad efter watching this doc, hopefully this island wil be saved.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000562962050 Happy Balikid

    ''a true hero of nature."

  • Del Morrison

    Its sad in 30 years that island will be under water

  • Fiachra Mac Allister

    beautiful

  • bye_bags

    The "background" music is everywhere but in the background. I watched this video in spite of the music.

  • brianrose87

    Haha wow. What a simple yet profound statement.

    This whole doc conveys a message of tremendous effort over time to make a small change... yet it will be entirely wiped out within a generation.

    On one side, it will be wiped out BY OUR GLOBAL ACTIONS.

    On the other side, it cannot be saved BY ANY INDIVIDUAL.

    Que sera sera...

  • John Hofmann IV

    The idea was great, but the whole process of how he developed the island was excluded. This was a significant error of the producer(s). The never-ending discussion about conservation and greedy capitalists also completely overshadowed this man's amazing accomplishment.

    In addition, the music and discussions didn't flow, and it was quite apparent that the producer(s) should have taken advice from those who were more mature and experienced.

    It's a shame actually that this documentary wasn't developed in a way that appealed to many viewers. As I often say to myself while golfing, "Great shot, wrong direction."

  • sknb

    wow i totally disagree

    found it consistently beautiful with an eye on the future

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_LK6B2HGMK4EHZ6YJ3I6WFKY77U DigiWongaDude

    The people of Seychelles are so beautiful, gentle, kind and polite... and you can see it here so clearly. The west will tempt and persuade and promise with sincerity, not to spoil or destroy, pollute or betray. But 4 tiny islands, with white golden sands and crystal clear water somehow require 259 swimming pools to improve things. Very impolite, unkind, ungentle and ugly.

  • Paulina Plezia

    Yeah, there are already probably about a million hotels around the world. Leave the Seychelles alone...

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_LK6B2HGMK4EHZ6YJ3I6WFKY77U DigiWongaDude

    One man puts a stick in the ground, turning down £24million to sell, not for himself but for something vastly bigger. The rational free market types would find it difficult to explain such altruism. Yet the rational free market types are also irrationally destroying the planet and, potentially, this man's stand...and that is somehow poetic to you? Well I have news for you, despite such defeatism, this island won't be sold or sunk, despite the efforts and ignominity of so many.

  • brianrose87

    DigiWongaDude,

    We likely agree on far more than you surmise. My comment was in response to Del Morrison's statement about how the island would be underwater in 30 years, which is increasingly likely. CO2 emissions have not stabilized; in fact, the rate of increase has risen!

    Our insistence on immediate growth, consumption, and trivial pursuits at the cost of our future was the global action I was referring to.

    I was talking about how this island will be consumed by the rising oceans due to our global actions, not to whether someone will buy the island and disrupt its ecosystem.

    That's why I would predict that we agree on far more than you had presumed.

    In terms of poetry, however, poetry isn't about butterflys and rainbows. Here's a relevant example:

    Ozymandias by Bysshe Shelley

    (This is widely considered one of the greatest poems of all time. Although, I think rating poems in greatness is quite shallow and misses the point of poetry, but I digress.)

    "I met a traveller from an antique land
    Who said: `Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
    Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand,
    Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
    And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
    Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
    Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
    The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed.
    And on the pedestal these words appear --
    "My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
    Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!"
    Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
    Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
    The lone and level sands stretch far away."

    This poem reflects on the fact that even today's greatest triumphs or evils, emperors or saints, empires or works, will be swallowed by the sands of time. Poems actually tend to be quite melancholy as a matter of fact, but then again poets tend not to be the cheeriest bunch to begin with.

    I mention this poem in particular because it is congruous with my statement about the profundity of a lifetime of work and accomplishment being wiped out by the indiscriminate rise of the oceans. Certainly whoever is reading this sees the striking similarity.

    The oceans WILL swallow this mans life of work. That is not defeatism; it is realism. If accepting that eventuality motivates even a single person to start a garden and consume less, then it is of value.

    Live simply, so that others may simply live.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_LK6B2HGMK4EHZ6YJ3I6WFKY77U DigiWongaDude

    @ brianrose87 Your post deserves much more, but it has my thumbs up. Clearly I misread you, apologies.

  • Michael Silverman

    RIP Brendon

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Patrick-Hamilton/100000246654434 Patrick Hamilton

    Travel well, Mr. Grimshaw......the world needs people like you now more than ever.....RIP....

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1281457118 Anna Kirby-Bailey

    You will be sadly missed RIP

  • Derek Olsen

    This isn't a competition.

  • Martes Mar

    If Only there are more of us, who have the same respect for our planet and our natural environment, we could have it all. Our children would be proud of us ,instead of disgusted , by the destruction we are presently doing to the Planet Mother Earth . It is devastating to watch the way we are destroying Nature and all the animals too.

  • Martes Mar

    We need to spread the awareness to stop destroying the environment and all creatures living on it . Each one of us can do his bit .

  • Alv V

    I hope that place will remain as it is.

  • May

    I was quite sad watching it. Such a stunning island. I wish that people could still see the beauty of nature. Yet more & more it is just greed. Joni Mitchell's Paved paradise kept playing in my head. I can't even tell you how happy I was to see the end.

  • Stin

    I could not imagine a truer existence. An example of true humanty. An inspiration to every man woman and child on this Earth.

    PS: Why do business men only think of the damned money??

  • Stin

    The tourism industry IS fake.

  • Stin

    Why such a high cost to do nothing to it? Why does leaving things to naturally grow cost money???

    Have we been so indoctrinated to think that we need to intervene all the time.. Grrrr.

  • John Manning

    You... Jock! Grrrr Your good looks perfect life (high-school included) it's sooo obvious by this shallow, flippant defense tossed into the ring by you...

    Signed,
    J.M.
    Channeling Johnathan Swift a la "A Modest Proposal."

  • John Manning

    Dude, Lighten up a bit. Don't get all deep and philosophical about this flick... Cuz this flick was a comedy if I'm not mistaken.

    P.S.
    Brian Rose knows what's up... chill.

  • John Manning

    Yep!