Seven Wonders of Ancient Greece

The storied mythical history of Ancient Greece is profiled in the Discovery Channel's Seven Wonders of Ancient Greece. The sites covered in the film:

The Palace of Knossos - A labyrinth on the island of Crete, said to have been built by the King Minos to house a mythical creature known as a Minotaur - a combination of a bull and man, a sacred animal in the eyes of his people, and his unfaithful wife.

The Oracle of Delphi - A tough-to-reach mountain refuge where priests were believed to be able to predict the future, which turned the site into the center of the Greek empire where unfathomable wealth and treasure accumulated. The oracle priests were consulted on every major issue by Greek leaders.

The Theatre of Epidaurus - An amphitheater built into the hills near Athens, it is a 14,000-seat performance venue that is the crowning jewel of the ancient Greek theatre community. The acoustics of the space are so masterful, they have yet to be topped even to this day.

The Colossus of Rhodes - Built in the port of the island of Rhodes, it stood for more than a century and was nearly the height of the Statue of Liberty. An engineering marvel for its time, it was one of the original Seven Wonders of the World and was built as a wooden frame covered with bronze plates.

The Birth of the Olympics - In July every fourth year, beginning in the eighth century B.C. and continuing for 1200 years, athletes from every corner of the Greek world convened to compete against each other to name one man as the Olympic Champion of the world. Its popularity and prestige were akin to that of the National Football League's in the U.S. in present day.

The Lost City of Atlantis - A utopian metroplis believed to be lost to some sort of cataclysmic event that buried it beneath the ocean near the present day island of Santorini.

The Parthenon - built on the Acropolis, a landmark hill overlooking the city of Athens, The Parthenon was a temple built to celebrate the Greek's outlasting the Persians in an epic war that nearly wiped them out altogether.

Watch the full documentary now