The Veneer of Justice in a Kingdom of Crime

2016 ,    »  -   10 Comments
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8.85
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Ratings: 8.85/10 from 88 users.
Storyline
The Veneer of Justice in a Kingdom of Crime

During the 1980s, in the aftermath of the costly savings and loan scandal, up to a thousand executives from Wall Street were prosecuted for the roles they played in perpetuating financial fraud on a massive scale. Many were convicted and sent to prison. Cut to the Wall Street of today, as America and much of the world continues to attempt a recovery from the largest financial crisis since the Great Depression, and we witness a very different narrative.

In the wake of a criminal act which cost the economy a conservative estimate of 13 trillion dollars, not a single instigator of this calamity has been brought before a court of law. The intriguingly titled documentary The Veneer of Justice in a Kingdom of Crime examines the reasons why.

The film provides a smart and concisely observed summary of the cause and effect behind the financial meltdown which occurred beginning in 2008, and targets the investment banking firm Goldman Sachs as its main orchestrator. The ethical obscenity represented by this global financial collapse is clear. Eager customers were knowingly sold toxic mortgages by the world's largest financial institutions, who then bet big against their clients' ability to pay. In short, these firms wagered against the economy and the middle class, and reaped major profits for themselves as a result.

In light of such gross manipulation - and the destruction that it's caused throughout the globe - the lack of meaningful punishment for the key players behind the crisis has been nothing short of infuriating. Does "too big to fail" mean "immune from the scrutiny of the law"? The filmmakers seem to think so.

With an impassioned activism, The Veneer of Justice in a Kingdom of Crime sets it glare not only on offenders like Goldman Sachs, but also on the impotence of the Department of Justice. Their failure to successfully investigate and prosecute these heinous crimes points to a major failing in America's legal system. Relying on reams of documents and incriminating testimonies, the film shows how these financial institutions operate by their own laws, avoid regulatory oversight, and remain shielded from criminal indictment.

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10 Comments / User Reviews

  1. Adriaen22

    John Titus just keeps getting better and better. In this documentary, he has married together two otherwise very dry topics (law and finance) and has managed to infuse enough drama and tension to strike that all important emotional chord in everyone. With an absolutely masterful sound track by Professor KLIQ, this is a rock'em sock'em expose of the rot at the top. POWERFUL!

  2. BB Boone

    The Veneer of Justice shows unequivocally the rule in America is gone. The research done for Mr. Titus' work is exceptional.

  3. Garyp40

    John Titus has been bringing to light the couruption and cover up of big banks and government for years. The clarity in which he explains the actions of "The Untouchables" is done brilliantly. He has truly gone to the next level. There are none so blind as to those who cannot see. Thank you for the glasses John.

  4. Squito

    There is an underlying commonality that exists with these financial and justice players. With this crisis as well as every other crisis of the same kind that has infected this country since it's inception. As well as untold numbers of other countries. Rothschild, Greenspan, Paulson, Breuer, Blankfein, Suleiman, Geithner.... and on and on and on. History has imprinted the never-ending purpose and mission of these people. Yet, it continues unabated.

  5. Shrive Cheney

    What about me, I lost 80 percent of my retirement savings

  6. Tom

    So the question becomes; will anything be done, and by whom? A system of government that has been so blatantly corrupted at the highest level by the world's most powerful financial elites can only be purged by a populous rebellion- a strong grass-roots movement. Is that
    possible in the U.S.? It seems that, even among the well informed, too few recognize their duty to serve in a truly participatory form of democracy, which is our only hope.

  7. Johnny

    Excellent factual documentary which makes it's points very clearly.
    I'll look forward to the next documentary, possibly about how the DoJ ignored issues regarding the "Heir Apparent" to the American crown.

  8. Russ Tul

    This is extortion pure and simple -- at the highest level of government. How is it possible that in a democracy, the banks can put the DOJ out of commission just because they are big? Might is now right in the USA. How sad.

  9. Daniel Day

    The level and depth of corruption in our country is simply astounding and heartbreaking. So many ordinary people have sacrificed so much to make this a great country and now to watch it all be thrown away is sad beyond words.

  10. yeoshi yamamoto

    A 500 million penalty for a 1.5+ billion profit is still an amazing return. Not to mention the trillions Golden Sachs made at the expense of all the investors. The crimes continue and the DOJ is bought and paid for by your investments. Then we get Obama paying the Too Big to Fail Banksters trillions upon trillions of dollars to thank them for their efforts at defrauding the whole world. Canada did the same but hid the fact under the toilet seat. The frauds continue with 9/11 to justify the most lucrative war in the world's history, Iraq and the Middle East. And let us not forget that just prior to 9/11 Dicky Cheney said that his military could not account for the loss of 3 trillion dollars; so he had a missile bomb the Pentagon where the investigators had they documents and whilel they were working conveniently killed them at the same time. He did the same with WTC7 that was never attacked by a plain noro have any substantial fire but destroyed by controlled demolition. WHAT??? He was in charge of the fraud. Too bad this video has such a loud sound track that overpowers the narrator; I cannot watch it.

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