Congo, My Precious

2017, Society  -   16 Comments
Storyline

The Democratic Republic of Congo is one of the world's most resource-rich countries. The region harbors a wealth of gold, diamonds, uranium, and other highly lucrative minerals. So why are so many of the country's people forced to live in fear and squalor? Produced by the exceptional RT Documentary channel, Congo, My Precious illustrates how the blessings of these resources have become a curse for much of the country's struggling and weary population.

The story of the Congo has long been stained by greed, tragedy and bloodshed. Under the rule of King Leopold II of Belgium, their mineral mines were operated much like slave camps, and workers were savagely abused if they failed to reach their daily quota. Much to the relief of its citizens, the country finally won its independence in 1960.

It was in that year that the film's central interview subject was born, a husband and father named Bernard Kalume Buleri. Alas, for Buleri and countless others, the promise of independence for all proved meaningless and empty. In his frank and vulnerable testimony, he speaks of his tortured existence in his homeland, his fierce love for his family, and a previous experience during the Rwandan genocide that is among the most haunting anecdotes you're likely to hear.

Rebel militants illegally seize the country's mines on a regular basis, and commit heinous acts of violence and human rights violations in the process. Child slave labor is often used for their mining operations, including those involving coltan, a valuable mineral used in a variety of the world's most popular electrical products. Rebel fractions can make as much as $120 for every kilogram of the mineral they're able to attain, but their exploited work force must live off as little as $10 a week. As one Congolese mining supervisor explains, "It's still mostly foreigners who profit from it, while we're still as poor as we always have been."

Congo, My Precious is an extremely impactful portrait of human suffering. Its subjects are burdened by the ghosts of their past, and they long for normal lives free from terror and insurmountable economic hardship.

Directed by: Anastasia Trofimova
240
8.66
12345678910
Ratings: 8.66/10from 87 users.

More great documentaries

16 Comments / User Reviews

  1. aubrey

    Hi Ann, just one small important question, is it the white man doing the killing or is it their own People? If I offer you financial comfort to do something for me are you going to refuse and continue living in your lazy squaler? Put the blame where the blame is due,all and I mean all people will do what ever the think is necessary to maintain life. Be careful it could happen to you one day.

  2. Adrian

    @Guest (white european person)
    So, what are you doing to stop this madness? Organised any protests? wrote to ministers? created an organisation/group of people in your country who oppose this looting of Congo, etc...?

  3. xela

    How much we still do not know ?! So sad what´s happening out there, I wish I could help all those people, I wish we all could. The thing is we pretend to be helping, sending money to children, poor people etc. and on the other hand we´re raping them in the worst way.

  4. Mia

    Excellent documentary. It brings so much awareness to serious issues of wealth distribution.

  5. paul

    I just watched this very glad i did ..any ideas on how i could help?

  6. Ceci

    Excellent film. Now it's time for action, not pity. If you don't want to be a generalization, stop accepting and purchasing the products OR demand to know the origin of your products. CONSUMERS drive any industry. No matter your Ethnicity: White, yellow or turquoise greed is evil and affects more than the people being oppressed. That evil seeps into the very souls of those inflicting the damage.

  7. Parimal Chatterjee

    I am Speechless. A must see for all who love documentaries with Human values.

  8. Angela

    Exceptionally eye-opening documentary that really made me think twice about all the things and options I have that I take for granted. My heart really goes out to these people, and I wish there was an honest way to help them from without involving another whole circle of money looting charity organisations. I mean to really help them like organising groups of volunteers to go and teach the kids.

  9. Thalos

    First off, what a great documentary! It is a stunning depiction of the misery that is reality for many of the peoples of the DRC. It is very sad that this is how the situation is, and I truly hope it will change for the better.

    That said, I think putting all the blame for the situation on the now living Europeans is wrong. And putting the blame on all white people is simply racist. The misery brought by the Belgians is long past, and the country has had a lot of time to heal, rebuild and organize. Many of its fellow African states have managed exactly that (Uganda, Angola, Rwanda), the DRC has not. It was certainly not left poor. Like they say in the documentary: the DRC is one of the countries with the most natural resources in the world.

    Corporations pray on all nationalities, regardless of colour. If you think there arent Europeans suffering poverty and harm due to corporations; you are wrong. The main difference is that in many European states society has managed to organize itself into a system that in many ways work to protect its citizens from corporations and from the government itself. If it hadnt been for this most European states would suffer the same faith as the DRC and many other states where similar situations are taking place (corporations use despicable means to get cheap raw material that it makes a fortune selling, with little to nothing going back to the local population, and with governments not doing what they are supposed to do to prevent it).

  10. Dattatreya

    This made me sad ...

    These guys should not cater to the needs and wants of the " market " , but become self sufficient , by ... for example, keeping cows for dairy , growing crops etc ...

    But cow killing and animal killing in general ( outside of perhaps some merciful form of hunting ) brings intense misery ... war ... pestilence etc ... so ... stay away from that ...

    BTW ... plastic bottle ( especially in hot weather ) and aluminium pots are bad for you !!!

  11. GunnarInLA

    gave it 9 stars. – This documentary hammers in the value of documentary film making...I had read from time to time about Congo and had a sketchy idea of what was taking place. But this documentary reveals with stunning clarity what no amount of written words ever could, in my opinion...Fantastic work...
    (I'm a white European, living in LA and Anne has every right to generalize...look at Europe today – do people not claim it's all "democratic"? – ..they do. And so "ordinary people" implicitly endorse what their ultra-criminal leaders do... The "European Union" is weak and pathetic, it has no voice and shivers every time the Imperial Center roars its commands...Europeans are blind and utterly lacking in self-respect...look at the "leaders"...May...Merkel...Macron...what are they all about...? – They are all about Supremacism and subservience to the US...Crime works and Political Criminality cannot be defeated in our time.)
    Watch this documentary – It is one of the best....

  12. abhishrut panbude

    May all the prosperous energies of the universe be with them.

  13. said

    As Anne comment the guest can be with she are satisfay to give for she the first mark to be continneud

  14. Were Naphtal

    The AU should wake up and handle DRC situation as it has done in Somalia. Sanity must prevail short of which genocide will happen with impunity.

  15. Guest

    @Anne
    I am a white european person. Please don't generalise.
    Thanks.

  16. Anne

    How can the Europeans sleep at night. They raped Africa and left the countries poor.
    White folks seem only interested in what they can get from the continent of Africa.
    The World Court should be initiating some form of crime of genocide. It seems white people can do what they like. The whole thing is a sad state of affairs