The Diesel Disaster

2019, Environment  -   5 Comments
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Ratings: 7.67/10from 15 users.

Budget-conscious drivers in Germany seized the opportunity to invest in diesel-fueled vehicles. The promise of high gas mileage and environmentally friendly emission levels was too alluring to resist. Now, in the wake of stricter limitations on nitrogen dioxide (NO2) emissions, many of these consumers are stuck with cars they are forbidden to drive, and their vehicles are becoming less valuable and more obsolete by the day. The Diesel Disaster investigates the real hazards posed by these emissions, and what it means for the future of "green" automobiles.

The controversy represents a battle between environmental activists and the exceedingly lucrative auto makers in Germany. The consumers are caught in the middle.

Bolstered by World Health Organization recommendations, German environmental agencies contend that intensified NO2 levels (such as those produced by diesel automobiles) can lead to widespread pollution, increased health concerns and premature deaths. Not so, say some members of the medical and research communities dismissing these critiques as empty analytical evaluations which lack the support of real world evidence. On the other hand, it is often impossible to isolate and measure the precise impact of NO2 in the formation of pulmonary disease and other disorders.

The filmmakers rely on the expertise of environmental scientists and medical professionals in their quest to find consensus in this debate. They question the accuracy of emission readings, its ultimate impact on the health of city dwellers, and the effectiveness of an overall diesel ban. Can German citizens trust the allegations being lobbed from either side of the issue? Are these environmental restrictions too strict or too lax, and how do they measure up to those that regulate other major cities across the globe?

While the debate continues to mount, the courts have banned diesel driving in several German cities, and many others are in line for similar restrictions. This could potentially take hundreds of thousands of drivers off the road, impacting their employment security and property values.

The Diesel Disaster reaches no definitive answers in this ongoing debate, but offers a wealth of well-reasoned arguments that viewers can use to form their own conclusions.

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5 Comments / User Reviews

  1. Jack

    If you really want cleaner air! Then stop all Global "Geoengineering" and or "Climate engineering" utilizing 2.5-10 micron size "Nano particulates" that harm all life. Animal, plant, insect, fish, etc. Diesel engines emissions? That is chump change in the scheme of things. The Global aerosol dispersement of these particulates invades the Brain, Heart, Lungs, Liver, Kidneys, Immune system etc. Slowly destroying one's body and all functions thereof. Lots of data out there to support my claim. Are you a willing test rat in the aerosol poisoning of the Global atmosphere?

  2. Ricardo Villa

    Appalling that the government and environmentalists wield such power. They don't have the scientific empirical evidence to back up their draconican rules but don't need it because most people don't have time to do the research and find this out. Their rules are designed to steer more and more of us into public transportation or bicycles -- needlessly and with real impact on both the economy and a person's well being. Excellent documentary that shows where the environmentalists in the U.S. would like to take us.

  3. Paul

    Those ***holes. Those people bought those cars legally. And guess what? That emissions bullshit is just that.

  4. b fearn

    The big car companies in German still do not understand that they can make emission free cars and have been able to do so for years. They simply prefer to put their profits before the people and the planet.

    1. Paolo Gargaro

      there is no such thing as an emission-free car yet...electric cars simply move emissions from the tailpipe to the electrical plant that burns coal, natural gas or uses forever hazardous nuclear fuel.
      smaller more efficient engines burning whatever, in small light cars that have a governed max speed of 120 would go a long way towards helping, much more so than the electric alternatives.
      We need to put cars on the road that we need, not the cars that we want. Save the big 350 hp sedans and 700 hp Hellcats for the track only and lets get practical about transportation.