How Animals Do That

How Animals Do ThatProduced in association with the Discovery Channel, this documentary has assembled some of the most fascinating facts now known about the animals on this planet.

The film footage is fabulous, and the explanatory graphics help us understand how the survival mechanisms of certain animals work.

Starting with the harsh temperatures of the Arctic winter, we see how polar bears endure the climate with their protective layers and acute sense of smell.

The film then moves south to Antarctica, and to penguins and how they survive. The extraordinary vision of the eagle is examined, and the keen olfactory talents of the wolf and salmon.

This documentary is available for preview only. Get it at Amazon.com.

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Ratings: 6.00/10 from 5 users.
  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_CUQQJZXFPPV5QUSMBVUQ4JYYTY Akshay

    Good Doc
    You'll definitely learn a lot about wild animals.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=667804759 Aaron Joseph Clegg

    This is pretty cool, but
    1) They need more of the diagram visuals, and
    2) They need a bit more detail on a few of these adaptations. Sometimes they just toss in a cool vocab word without defining it or showing how it works.

    Plus, with an eagle, they say something like "a fovea is like a telephoto lens that zooms in on something." That's not exactly right. Humans have fovea as well, at the center of our field of view, giving us the ability to see crisp edges and vibrant colors. Outside the fovea (our peripheral vision) things are not so clear (i.e.- we cannot read text). It's a question of resolution, not magnification. What makes an eagle's vision unique is that each eye has TWO fovea instead of just one. It's not that the fovea does something that others don't.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/V5SPGMDD3PSB4TVP36A4BFHJAU l33t Hacker

    boring its only 7 min big bad show see better than that