First Man

First Man

2017, Science  -   6 Comments
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Ratings: 7.57/10 from 7 users.

Our evolutionary journey, stretching back 25 million years from the ape-like Piolatherus, reveals several crucial factors shaping humanity. Social structures emerged early, with Piolatherus living in groups and communicating through grooming. This suggests cooperation, a vital trait for survival in early humans. It likely facilitated raising young, defending against predators, and sharing resources within the group.

Tool use became another cornerstone. Early humans crafted diverse tools, adapting stones for sharper edges. This innovation likely aided hunting and gathering activities, allowing them to access a wider range of food sources and potentially increasing their dietary diversity. Bipedalism, the ability to walk upright, offered further advantages. Freed hands facilitated carrying tools and potentially covering greater distances, expanding exploration and resource acquisition. This may have also contributed to improved energy efficiency and allowed for the development of larger brains.

The concept of death and its impact on early humans is also explored. Evidence suggests an awareness of death, with chimpanzees even exhibiting similar behavior. This may have led to the development of rituals surrounding death, hinting at early forms of empathy and compassion in our ancestors.

A major turning point came with the domestication of fire. It provided warmth, protection from predators, and a method for cooking food. Cooked food eased digestion, allowing the body to extract more nutrients and potentially contributing to the development of larger brains. Fire also facilitated nighttime activities, extending the productive hours for early humans.

Another crucial leap was the development of speech, allowing for more effective communication and knowledge transfer across generations. This undoubtedly fueled innovation and societal growth. Speech allowed early humans to share hunting strategies, tool-making techniques, and potentially even stories and cultural practices. This collective knowledge base accelerated advancements and ensured the survival of future generations.

The emergence of Homo erectus, a species with a larger brain and bipedalism, further highlights our evolutionary path. This species is believed to be an ancestor of variations like Neanderthals. Homo erectus' larger brain suggests increased cognitive abilities, potentially leading to more complex social structures and tool development.

Finally, Homo sapiens' ability to adapt, invent, and cooperate is posited as the key to outcompeting other human species and ultimately populating the entire planet. Their dominance marks the culmination of millions of years of evolutionary advancements, where each adaptation built upon the previous one. This ability to adapt and innovate continues to propel humanity forward, shaping our relationship with the environment and defining our future.

Directed by: Fred Fougea, Jérôme Guiot

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john
john
3 months ago

dreadful eating habits, they don't even use serviettes.

john
john
3 months ago

all myth. Who came up with that silly "evolution" idea? Life is run successfully only by co-operation. Competition is an obvious conclusion looking at behaviour but look deeper and it can be seen that co-operation is the winning method. Competition merely kills.

john
john
3 months ago

what utter infantile rubbish.

Jackal
Jackal
3 months ago

One has to wonder how Creationism fits into this picture?