Seeds of Permaculture

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Ratings: 8.21/10 from 96 users.

Storyline

Seeds of Permaculture

One of the reasons for shooting this film is the global climate change. All around the world, as you know, places are experiencing odd weather events.

All around the world, whether you're in South America, in North America, in Europe, in Asia, people are experiencing weather patterns that are out of the norm.

So, one of the reasons that permaculture is getting so popular right now, growing faster than ever before, on an exponential curve of growth, is because our planet needs it. It's time for the important changes that permaculture has to give.

People are becoming less and less self-sufficient around the world, these local communities that were previously growing everything themselves and knew how to build their own houses out of natural materials are completely dependent on big foreign powers and import from other countries.

One of the challenges that permaculture has out in front of it is proving to the world that it can be a viable form of profitable agriculture. Through the development of a master plan for your site or your project, it's possible to really lay out enhancement strategies that make it more likely that you and your project can become profitable.

One of the most important aspects to the ecological farm is the making of compost, about improving the soil, and constantly bringing more organic matter and more life into the soil. The compost production process is actually really easy. It's accessible to anyone, it doesn't take expensive parts, and it doesn't take that much space. All you need are several simple ingredients, and those ingredients can come from any number of sources.

Ultimately with the master plan, what we're looking for is to achieve our holistic goals. We want the economics of the site to be in line, we want the ecology of the site to be continuously improving, and we want the personal needs of the residents there to be met.

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31 Comments / User Reviews

  1. Michelle

    I love this.I want to join them.

  2. Kansas Devil

    That's a fun little tune at the end.
    Still, did you notice no one was very old? Permaculture is not well suited to old people. It's an idea from the old days when people died before they got too old to be of any use.

  3. manni

    Yeah, I agree that the actual process is one for young fit people. Any kind of manual labour is difficult in old age but I'm not so keen on the idea of people being too old to be of any use! I think that perception is what leads to the neglect of the elderly (and shoving them in old people's homes is neglect as far as I'm concerned). Human beings have been looking after their elderly relatives for thousands of years. Remains are often found which have no teeth and remodelling of the jaw bone which indicates that even long after physical health is declining, people were able to survive and therefore must have been cared for. I don't think we should dismiss permaculture because it is not suited to old people. We just need to address how we treat the elderly as a separate issue. Even when they're too old to be involved in direct production of crops they could still serve important functions like minding children, educating, carrying out light activities etc. Things which are beneficial for everyone!

  4. Paul Gloor

    Permaculture... Growing people, because nature already knows what its doing.

  5. jude arsenault

    veganic permaculture is the best

  6. jude arsenault

    we are nothing if we do not take care of our elders.

  7. Indio Jones

    ? What is old to you and to the other responders? Indio Jones here in Nicaragua. I am 46, and work the field, but for the most part it takes designers, coordinators, liasons, social media people as well. No canes required for this.

  8. jaberwokky

    We are nothing if we cannot look through our brothers eyes with some compassion.

  9. jaberwokky

    It is for us vegans. Not necessarily for everyone else.

  10. jaberwokky

    You could probably copyright that. If you don't then it's mine :)

  11. jaberwokky

    Aaaaah ... there's nothing like a nice shiny piece of hope after a hard day wondering what the hell is the point of your life. Grrrrrrrr.

  12. Paul Gloor

    Open licence, be sure to give credit :P

  13. jaberwokky

    It's the kind of license worth respecting so of course I will. :)

  14. Stephen Nightingale

    My relatives live in Sri Lanka and every one of them has a yard abundantly provisioned with food bearing plants and trees that can help them towards self-provisioning. But I would suggest that it is not a large challenge for them, because with the climate they have, stuff just grows. A more realistic and useful challenge would be for all those American and European permaculturists to work towards solving the problems of sustainable self-provisioning and community provisioning in temperate, northern climates.

    I would love to see a follow-on documentary about how, for example, our pre-industrial revolution ancestors provided sustainably for their communities. I accept that the answers were very different in North America and in Europe. since the common people in Europe had to work with the constraints of the Norman and similar feudal land grabs.

  15. Sheri Goodwin

    FOOD FOREST! That is it , that is exactly what I am trying to do on 10 acres, just didn't really have a name, just a concept in my mind,

  16. Jo McKay

    excellent; all these examples can be used to improve soils and production in the Northern Hemisphere as well. Our fruits and some veg will be different of course. Add a small greenhouse.some raised garden beds, use dwarf tree or shrub varieties (or keep them trimmed), and any age can garden in comfort. I think this is our best hope for food security.

  17. a_no_n

    i think it's worth noting that people in the world are getting less and less sufficient because more and more of them are getting poorer.

    Poor people, arguably the people most in need of this kind of thing, are priced out of it because things like yards and gardens are unobtainable luxuries.

    Also what about the actual long term local ecological effects of what is happening here? presumably everything that used to call those fields and orchards home are now considered pests and are hounded away...that's never good for an ecosystem or anywhere surrounding it.

    For what? so that other middle class hipsters can have extra tomatoes that they could probably afford anyway if they have that much land in their name. If done in large enough numbers it'll drop demand for food and push up the prices for the poor who actually need the fresh food, but already can't afford it.

    Organic farming is anywhere up to 25% less efficient than modern farming methods...GM crops promises to add to that efficiency. By mass farming organicly you're taking a massive step backward...like tossing away an smooth iron plow for the sake of going back to that jagged old bronze one.

    Land is a precious commodity, and we're having to share it with more and more people as the population of our species grows. To be honest it irks me seeing well off middle class hipsters ignorantly causing problems under the self serving misinformed guise of saving the world.

    I'm not saying people shouldn't grow their own food, or that the documentary doesn't have good advice, but what these people are doing is wrong! Growing our own food is something we should all be able to do...but when I say all I mean ALL, as in poor people deserve to be able to do it too, and they can't due to the lack of land availability...So whilst this experience might make a few people feel REALLY good about themselves, little by little it's screwing over everyone else and continuing to filter food into the hands of fewer and fewer people.

  18. a_no_n

    I also love the frankly racist overtones...that the simple savage natives need to be shown by the handsome civilised white man on how best to live their lives. because they just can't do it right by themselves.

  19. Permie

    Great comment! Totally agree, it is about reclaiming the commons. Certainly we need more of that in Europe and North America but the good news is that it is growing and their are many initiatives on the rise.

  20. a_no_n

    i don't accept your first correction, i feel it is based on an ideal as opposed to the reality...if it was as easy as siwzing a bit of tasty land and growing your own do you not think people would do it? I see rhetoric but no actual realistic solution.

    Your second correction, yeah fair enough, i can see how that works and it makes sence, I'd be willing to concede that but again, it sounds a lot like rhetoric rather than reality.

    As far as racism goes, i disagree with you, and i don't think your explanation does you any favors either because it relies on the assumption that sometime in the 20th century the silly brown people all forgot how to farm...racism doesn't have to be consciously acted on or maliciously intended to still be racism, it just has to be ignorant..

  21. Indio Jones

    I didn't read between the lines of Permie. And saw no overtones. I am unfamiliar with anyone suggesting the species s.natives however I would say concisely that some generations (regardless of race) have not be properly educated in this skill. But I may have not been at the beginning of some dialogue. I venture to go on my way.

  22. Indio Jones

    Awesome name. I also like Edible Forest, Edible Acres.

  23. Indio Jones

    For clarity, and no judgement on your opinions, GM, referring to Genetically Modified, is a broad term that you would need to define better (breeding crops is technically modifying the genetic code of a plant offspring). Hence, sometimes GM may be considered good, maybe even strongly desirable. But, I humbly respect your passion to do the right thing. Excuse the intrusion on your thought.

  24. Indio Jones

    Then Join. I partially sponsored their video, and the team seem genuine. I considered it an investment on my venture to create an interest in my smart park in Nicaragua. O.

  25. Leora Rosner

    There is one thing that I find annoying in this vid: the music is too loud and becomes a nuisance. It also makes it hard to hear what people are saying and that is in fact the means of getting the story across. Lower the sound of the music, please!

  26. John Littler

    the futures on its way. and its looking a lot like the past... who'd av thunk it? this to me is a real breath of fresh air and a beautiful, truly organic bit of film-making. i live in a normal, urban, northern town in england and am trying to begin spreading this kind of message to my own community starting with a 6 x 10ft patch of land in front of my house. so far i have dug up 3 bushes and am researching what to plant :-/ but watch this space :-)

  27. bluetortilla

    BORING!!! There wasn't anything in here (not that I could actually stand to watch all of it) that I didn't learn at my old local co-op grocery.
    And arrogant too. Let's watch how the hip young white folk teach the Thais how to farm. Jeez Maleez...

  28. J Gohde

    A weird movie to say the least.

    It started out about climate change. Then it started talking about making compost. That part was interesting since it talked about adding Nitrogen, which was totally ignore in what I had previously read on the subject. Next, there was a diatribe on Hippies living in Thailand, which was totally weird for me to comprehend.

    That progressed into a long Thai diatribe about who knows what. Believe it or not, but I am NOT remotely fluent in Thai. So, that is when I gave up on this weird movie, or at around the 43 minute mark.

  29. Mark Bert

    Good point. People generally refer to GM foods as transgenic modification that is fairly new technology that allows things like animal genes to be put into plants, and the processes used usually rips up DNA and causes unseen mutation. Sysgenic modification has been done for years but uses natural processes and you can't make things like goats that make spider silk. If you learn anything about epigenetics you can see how our new methods might have unseen problems, but may be useful sometimes. That topic could take a whole book to explain. Mostly the new plants are no good, but some like the golden rice don't seem to show many problems.

    A side note... All ovens use all 3 types of heat unless you somehow are able to stop all movement of the air, keep it in a vacuum, or completely block it from EM radiation (none of which are really possible). We just decided to make them less efficient with most of them by focusing on one or the other and build them more cheaply. Convection is actually not as common as radiative ovens too, ever take physics there? Take a look at your toaster.

  30. ingekuijper

    Beautiful and inspiring film touching on many elements of permaculture. A genuine, happy and healthy group of people working on positive changes. Don't quite understand the comments below, they weren't trying to teach locals how to farm at all, in fact they were inspired by the locals food forest and clearly having a good relationship with them. If you're interested in permaculture, this is a good one to watch!

  31. Zachy

    This was both too specific and not specific enough. It did a bad job talking about permaculture in general and a bad job talking about projects specifically. That said it was well shot and edited. More of an inspiration video for someone already sold on the idea of permaculture.

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